Bouvet Brut Rose Excellence Front Label
Bouvet Brut Rose Excellence Front LabelBouvet Brut Rose Excellence Front Bottle ShotBouvet Brut Rose Excellence Back Bottle Shot

Bouvet Brut Rose Excellence

  • TP92
  • SJ92
750ML / 12.5% ABV
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4.3 276 Ratings
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4.3 276 Ratings
750ML / 12.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Bouvet Rosé Brut exhibits a brilliant, delicate salmon-pink color punctuated by fine, pinpoint bubbles which suggest the wines fresh, raspberry and cassis fragrance. On the palate it is very dry and crisp, with plump, succulent red fruit flavors offset by subtle earthy notes and a lovely generosity on the clean, persistent finish.

Critical Acclaim

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TP 92
Tasting Panel

Cherry skins and figs scent this 100% Cabernet Franc rosé. An energetic effervescence releases sweet cherry and tart cranberry. Minerality plays a key role on the long finish. 

SJ 92
The Somm Journal

Cherry skins and figs scent this 100% Cabernet Franc rosé. An energetic effervescence releases sweet cherry and tart cranberry. Minerality plays a key role on the long finish

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Bouvet

Bouvet

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Bouvet, France
Bouvet Winery Video

Founded by Etienne Bouvet in 1851, this Loire-based wine firm has been a subsidiary of Taittinger since 1974.

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Praised for its stately Renaissance-era chateaux, the picturesque Loire valley produces pleasant wines of just about every style. Just south of Paris, the appellation lies along the river of the same name and stretches from the Atlantic coast to the center of France.

The Loire can be divided into three main growing areas, from west to east: the Lower Loire, Middle Loire, and Upper/Central Loire. The Pay Nantais region of the Lower Loire—farthest west and closest to the Atlantic—has a maritime climate and focuses on the Melon de Bourgogne variety, which makes refreshing, crisp, aromatic whites.

The Middle Loire contains Anjou, Saumur and Touraine. In Anjou, Chenin Blanc produces some of, if not the most, outstanding dry and sweet wines with a sleek, mineral edge and characteristics of crisp apple, pear and honeysuckle. Cabernet Franc dominates red and rosé production here, supported often by Grolleau and Cabernet Sauvignon. Sparkling Crémant de Loire is a specialty of Saumur. Chenin Blanc and Cabernet Franc are common in Touraine as well, along with Sauvignon Blanc, Gamay and Malbec (known locally as Côt).

The Upper Loire, with a warm, continental climate, is Sauvignon Blanc country, home to the world-renowned appellations of Sancerre and Pouilly-Fumé. Pinot Noir and Gamay produce bright, easy-drinking red wines here.

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What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

How is sparkling rosé wine made?

There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

NDF276014_0 Item# 12713

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