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Trinity Hill Hawkes Bay Pinot Noir 2014

Pinot Noir from Hawkes Bay, New Zealand
  • WS90
  • WE90
13% ABV
  • JS91
  • WE92
  • WE90
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13% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Primary aromas of fresh raspberry, plum and brambly spice are evident. The wine shows soft, velvety tannins and will develop complex forest-floor and earthy characters with bottle age.

Pair with salmon, poultry and game dishes.

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
WS 90
Wine Spectator
Spicy, with fresh herbal notes and white pepper and fresh green tomato leaf accents to the crisp wild berry flavors at the core, the earth and tannin details gaining traction and momentum on the finish. Drink now through 2026.
WE 90
Wine Enthusiast
Trinity Hill has been one of the wineries pioneering inland portions of Hawke's Bay for Pinot Noir production. This is a medium-bodied, silky rendering of the variety, showing delicate and complex notes of cherries, sous bois and beet greens.
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Trinity Hill

Trinity Hill

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Trinity Hill, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand
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Trinity hill’s story began in 1987 when Winemaker John Hancock met Robert and Robyn Wilson in their London restaurant Bleeding Heart. Over a bottle of John’s award-winning Chardonnay, the concept of a Hawke’s Bay winery was born. They were convinced they could produce world-class wines in this region of New Zealand.

They also recognized the outstanding potential of Hawkes Bay’s Gimblett Gravels winegrowing district and in 1993 Trinity Hill became one of the region’s early pioneers, planting grape vines on a barren plot on the former bed of the Ngaruroro River. This 18-hectare vineyard is now known as the Gimblett Estate Vineyard. By 2001, The Gimblett Gravels Winegrowers Association was set up with 34 wineries and winegrowers from a “terroir”-defined area of the old Ngaruroro Riverbed. Trinity Hill was and remains a founding member.

Trinity Hill has superb vineyard sites and the winemaking skills to ensure that they can achieve their aims of crafting some of the world’s great wines. A philosophy of “Quality rather than Quantity” is important. Controlled yields ensure the intensity of flavor and elegant styles for which Trinity Hill is renowned.

Hawkes Bay

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An eclectic region on the east coast of the North Island, Hawkes Bay extends from wide, fertile, coastal plains, inland, to the coast range, whose peaks reach as high as 5,300 feet. While the flatter areas were historically more popular because they are easier to cultivate, their alluvial soils can be too fertile for vines. In the late 20th century, the drive for quality led growers to the hills where soils are free-draining, limestone-rich and more suited to producing high quality wines.

Over the passing of time, the old Ngaruroro River laid down deep, gravelly beds, which were subsequently exposed after a huge flood in the 1860’s. In the 1980s growers identified this stretch, which continues for approximately 800 ha, and named it the Gimblett Gravels. The zone has proven to be ideal for the production of excellent red wines, particularly Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah.

Today the area takes well-earned recognition for its Bordeaux blends and other reds. Expressive of intense stewed red and black berry with gentle herbaceous characters, Gimblett Gravels wines are suggestive of their cool climate origin, and on par with other top-notch Bordeaux blends around the globe.

Chardonnay is the top white grape in Hawkes Bay, making elegant wines, strong in stone fruit character. Sauvignon blanc comes in close behind, notable for its tropical, fruit forward qualities.

Pinot Noir

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One of the most finicky yet rewarding grapes to grow, Pinot Noir is a labor of love for many. However, the greatest red wines of Burgundy prove that it is unquestionably worth the effort. In fact, it is the only red variety permitted in Burgundy. Highly reflective of its terroir, Pinot Noir prefers calcareous soils and a cool climate, requires low yields to achieve high quality and demands a lot of attention in the vineyard and winery. It retains even more glory as an important component of Champagne as well as on its own in France’s Loire Valley and Alsace regions. This sensational grape enjoys immense international success, most notably growing in Oregon, California and New Zealand with smaller amounts in Chile, Germany (as Spätburgunder) and Italy (as Pinot Nero).

In the Glass

Pinot Noir is all about red fruit—strawberry, raspberry and cherry with some heftier styles delving into the red or purple plum and in the other direction, red or orange citrus. It is relatively pale in color with soft tannins and a lively acidity. With age (of which the best examples can handle an astounding amount) it can develop hauntingly alluring characteristics of fresh earth, savory spice, dried fruit and truffles.

Perfect Pairings

Pinot’s healthy acidity cuts through the oiliness of pink-fleshed fish like salmon and tuna but its mild mannered tannins give it enough structure to pair with all sorts of poultry: chicken, quail and especially duck. As the namesake wine of Boeuf Bourguignon, Pinot noir has proven it isn’t afraid of beef. California examples work splendidly well with barbecue and Pinot Noir is also vegetarian-friendly—most notably with any dish that features mushrooms.

Sommelier Secret

For administrative purposes, the region of Beaujolais is often included in Burgundy. But it is extremely different in terms of topography, soil and climate, and the important red grape here is ultimately Gamay. Truth be told, there is a tiny amount of Gamay sprinkled around the outlying parts of Burgundy (mainly in Maconnais) but it isn’t allowed with any great significance and certainly not in any Villages or Cru level wines.

SWS382450_2014 Item# 159291