Processing Your Order...

Search for ""

Update your browser to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to update and using the latest version
of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

Yes, Update Now
Flat front label of wine
Flat front label of wineFront shot of wine bottle

G.D. Vajra Barolo Albe 2013

Nebbiolo from Barolo, Piedmont, Italy
  • WS93
  • V92
0% ABV
  • RP91
  • W&S91
  • WS92
  • WE90
  • WS93
  • WE93
  • WE94
  • WS91
  • D90
  • WS90
  • WS94
  • RP93
All Vintages
Currently Unavailable $37.99
Try the
40
37 99
Save $2.01 (5%)
Ships Tomorrow
Limit 0 bottles per customer
Sold in increments of 0
Add to Cart
0
Limit Reached
4.0 11 Ratings
My Wine Share
Vintage Alert
Alert me when new vintages are available
Rate for better recommendations
(256 characters remaining)
Cancel Save

4.0 11 Ratings
0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Albe is a classic style Barolo, born from three separate vineyardsall at varying altitudes and exposures. A traditional Barolo, where character and refined balance, beautiful flavors and ripe tannins merge and gift, with their perfect harmony, a true and authentic identity to this Barolo.

Bright ruby color. Red fruit and plum flavors, flowers, pine needles and a finish that reminds of bushes. Albe is the harmony of sophisticated and delicate perfumes, supported by an elegant acidity and ripe tannins.

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
WS 93
Wine Spectator
Aromas of fresh-cut hay and grass shade the flavors of cherry, black currant, violet and tobacco in this elegant, taut red. A little compact now on the finish, yet should stretch out with some age. Best from 2021 through 2032.
V 92
Vinous
Vajra's 2013 Barolo Albe is beautifully perfumed, sensual and expressive in this vintage, with a bit less overt fruit and more aromatic/structural intensity than is often the case. The style of the Albe has always favored a more succulent expression of Nebbiolo that is quite different from the single-vineyard wines, but the 2013 suggests Vajra may be moving the Albe closer in line stylistically to their other Barolos, which I think is a positive. In any event, there is an element of restraint in the 2013 that is hugely appealing. The Albe is a blend of fruit from Fossati, Coste di Vergne and La Volta aged in 75 hectoliter casks. The Albe may be the single best value in Barolo today. As for the 2013, don't miss it!
View More
G.D. Vajra

G.D. Vajra

View all wine
G.D. Vajra, Barolo, Piedmont, Italy
Image of winery
The winery is located at West side of Barolo Common, in Vergne locality. Inherited in 1972 by Aldo Vaira it's, today, a solid reality where the wine quality and the love for work are principal features. Here, the typical vines of Piedmont are cultivated with a great respect for the vocation of every plot of land. The history says that these lands have been formed millions of years ago, and geologically must be referred to as the Tortonian, the typical soil of Barolo and La Morra, with calcareous marl, white and blue, inserted into rocky residuals. Thanks to that, the wines are elegant, fragrant, fruity with a particular aging capacity.

The center of the production of the world’s most exclusive and age-worthy red wines made from Nebbiolo, the Barolo region includes five core townships: La Morra, Monforte d’Alba, Serralunga d’Alba, Castiglione Falletto and the Barolo village itself, as well as a few outlying villages. The landscape of Barolo, characterized by prominent and castle-topped hilltops, is one full of history and romance of the Nebbiolo grape. Its wines, with the signature “tar and roses” aromas, have a deceptively light garnet color but full presence on the palate and plenty of tannins and acidity. In a well-made Barolo, one can expect to find complexity and good evolution with notes of, for example, strawberry, cherry, plum, leather, truffle, anise, fresh and dried herbs, tobacco and violets.

There are two predominant soil types here, which distinguish Barolo from the lesser surrounding areas. Compact and fertile Tortonian sandy marls define the vineyards farthest west and at higher elevations. Typically the Barolo wines coming from this side, from La Morra and Barolo, can be approachable relatively early on in their evolution and represent the “feminine” side of Barolo, often closer in style to Barbaresco with elegant perfume and fresh fruit.

On the eastern side of the region, Helvetian soils of compressed sandstone and chalks are less fertile, producing wines with intense body, power and structured tannins. This more “masculine” style comes from Monforte d’Alba and Serralunga d’Alba. The township of Castiglione Falletto covers a spine with both soils types.

The best Barolo wines need 10-15 years before they are ready to drink, and can further age for several decades.

Nebbiolo

View all wine

Responsible for some of the most elegant and age-worthy wines in the world, Nebbiolo, named for the ubiquitous autumnal fog (called nebbia in Italian), is the star variety of northern Italy’s Piedmont region. Grown throughout the area as well as in the neighboring Valle d’Aosta and Valtellina, it reaches its highest potential in the Piemontese villages of Barolo and Barbaresco. This finicky grape and needs a very particular soil type and climate in order to thrive. Outside of Italy, growers are still very much in the experimentation stage but some success has been achieved in parts of California. Tiny amounts are produced in Washington, Virginia, Mexico and Australia.

In the Glass

Nebbiolo at its best is an elegant variety with velveteen tannins, mouthwatering acidity and a captivating perfume. Common characteristcs of a well-made Nebbiolo can include roses, violets, licorice, sandalwood, spicebox, smoke, potpourri, black plum, red cherry and orange peel. Light brick in color, Nebbiolo is a more powerful wine than one might expect, and its firm tannins typically need time to mellow.

Perfect Pairings

Nebbiolo’s love affair with food starts in Piedmont, which is home to the Slow Food movement and some of Italy’s best cuisine. The region is famous for its white truffles, wild boar ragu and tajarin pasta, all perfect companions to Nebbiolo.

Sommelier Secret

If you can’t afford to drink Barolo and Barbaresco every night, try the more wallet-friendly, earlier-drinking Langhe Nebbiolo or Nebbiolo d'Alba. Also search out the fine offerings of the nearby Roero region. North of the Langhe and Roero, find earthy and rustic versions of the variety (known here as “Spanna”) in Ghemme and Gattinara.

STC952804_2013 Item# 353702