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Fontanafredda Serralunga d'Alba Barolo 2010

Nebbiolo from Alba, Piedmont, Italy
  • WS93
  • RP93
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13.5% ABV
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13.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

This wine is garnet-red with ruby highlights that take on a slightly orange tone over time. The intense nose has overtones of vanilla, spices, withered roses and underbrush. It's dry, full-bodied with velvety texture and great balance. It is very long-lasting. Ideal with hearty red meat dishes and medium or mature cheeses.

Critical Acclaim

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WS 93
Wine Spectator
Dense and chewy, this red evokes cherry, tar, spice, earth and underbrush flavors. Stiff and drying on the finish now, yet has fine length and a balanced feel. Best from 2018 through 2033.
RP 93
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2010 Barolo del Comune di Serralunga d’Alba opens to a darkly saturated color and shows pretty highlight of wild cherry, cassis, black truffle, cola and menthol herb. This is the estate’s most popular wine with an annual production of 200,000 bottles. The wine is extremely focused and bright with the heft and structure that is common to Serralunga d’Alba. Some 80% of the fruit comes from the Fontanafredda estate and the other 20% is purchased off-site. Drink: 2017-2028.
JS 92
James Suckling
A firm, delicately fruit wine with blackberry, cedar and nutmeg character. Medium body, fine tannins and a dusty-textured finish. Better in 2015.
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Fontanafredda

Fontanafredda

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Fontanafredda, Alba, Piedmont, Italy
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Since 1878 Fontanafredda Estate & Winery, located in the heart of Piedmont's Langhe region, has been a benchmark for Barolo and Barbera wines that deftly balance deep aromas and concentration of fruit with elegance. Among the prized vineyard sites belonging to Fontanafredda are those in the commune of Serralunga d'Alba, a source of some of today's most distinctive and intriguing Barolo wines.

The history of Fontanafredda is a noble one. It began in 1858, when Vittorio Emanuele II, the first king of Italy, purchased the Fontanafredda estate -a former hunting preserve- as a country home. Soon thereafter, he began to produce fine red wines from indigenous grape varieties dolcetto, barbera and nebbiolo. In 1878 King Vittorio II died and his firstborn son, Count Emanuele Alberto di Mirafiori, inherited Fontanafredda. Count Mirafiori created the commercial business of wine from the estate and released the estate's first nebbiolo labeled as Barolo with the vintage 1878. Beginning in 1932, the estate transferred to Monte dei Paschi di Siena, the world's oldest bank, who retained ownership of Fontanafredda for 76 years.

An historic village situated right in between the famous regions of Barolo and Barbaresco, Alba is also the name for the larger wine region surrounding the village.

In a sense, “Alba” is a catch-all phrase, and includes the declassified Nebbiolo wines made in Barolo and Barbaresco, as well as the Nebbiolo grown just outside of these regions’ borders. In fact, Nebbiolo d’Alba is a softer, less tannic and more fruit-forward wine ready to drink within just a couple years of bottling. It is a great place to start if you want to begin to understand the grape. Likewise, the even broader category of Langhe Nebbiolo offers approachable and value-driven options as well.

Barbera, planted alongside Nebbiolo in the surrounding hills, and referred to as Barbera d’Alba, takes on a more powerful and concentrated personality compared to its counterparts in Asti.

Dolcetto is ubiquitous here and, known as Dolcetto d'Alba, can be found casually served alongside antipasti on the tables of Alba’s cafes and wine bars.

Not surprisingly, given its location, Alba is recognized as one of Italy’s premiere culinary destinations and is the home of the fall truffle fair, which attracts visitors from worldwide every year.

Nebbiolo

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Responsible for some of the most elegant and age-worthy wines in the world, Nebbiolo, named for the ubiquitous autumnal fog (called nebbia in Italian), is the star variety of northern Italy’s Piedmont region. Grown throughout the area as well as in the neighboring Valle d’Aosta and Valtellina, it reaches its highest potential in the Piemontese villages of Barolo and Barbaresco. This finicky grape and needs a very particular soil type and climate in order to thrive. Outside of Italy, growers are still very much in the experimentation stage but some success has been achieved in parts of California. Tiny amounts are produced in Washington, Virginia, Mexico and Australia.

In the Glass

Nebbiolo at its best is an elegant variety with velveteen tannins, mouthwatering acidity and a captivating perfume. Common characteristcs of a well-made Nebbiolo can include roses, violets, licorice, sandalwood, spicebox, smoke, potpourri, black plum, red cherry and orange peel. Light brick in color, Nebbiolo is a more powerful wine than one might expect, and its firm tannins typically need time to mellow.

Perfect Pairings

Nebbiolo’s love affair with food starts in Piedmont, which is home to the Slow Food movement and some of Italy’s best cuisine. The region is famous for its white truffles, wild boar ragu and tajarin pasta, all perfect companions to Nebbiolo.

Sommelier Secret

If you can’t afford to drink Barolo and Barbaresco every night, try the more wallet-friendly, earlier-drinking Langhe Nebbiolo or Nebbiolo d'Alba. Also search out the fine offerings of the nearby Roero region. North of the Langhe and Roero, find earthy and rustic versions of the variety (known here as “Spanna”) in Ghemme and Gattinara.

PIN392139_2010 Item# 128350