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Domaine Hubert Brochard Sancerre 2008

Sauvignon Blanc from Sancerre, Loire, France
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    Winemaker Notes

    The Sancerre Blanc is a wine that can be kept for roughly 5 years. It is dry, fruity, and best enjoyed chilled.

    It is ideal with seafood, fish in sauces, and with certain cheeses, especially the Crottin de Chavignol goat's cheese.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Domaine Hubert Brochard

    Domaine Hubert Brochard

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    Domaine Hubert Brochard, , France - Other regions
    Domaine Hubert Brochard
    For several generations (since 16th century), we have been growing our vineyard of Sancerre and Pouilly Fumé

    Aimée and Hubert Brochard have first made a significant contribution to the development of the family estate, devoting their whole life to the work of the vines and the quality and reputation of the wines.

    Later, their son, Henri and his wife Thérèse joined them and continued to take care of the vineyard

    Today, we work with passion and dynamism in respect of the family traditions and using the best of modern techniques. Our vineyard represents 55 hectares spread over the best hills of the Appellation around the villages of Chavignol, Ménétréol Sous Sancerre, Thauvenay, Sainte Gemme and Sancerre.

    Named “Oenotria” by the ancient Greeks for its abundance of grapevines, Italy has always had a culture that is virtually inextricable from wine. Wine grapes are grown just about everywhere throughout the country—a long and narrow boot-shaped peninsula extending into the Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas. The defining geographical feature of the country is the Apennine Mountain range, extending from Liguria in the north to Calabria in the south. The island of Sicily nearly grazes the toe of Italy’s boot, while Sardinia lies to the country’s west. Climate varies significantly throughout the country, with temperature being somewhat more dependent on elevation than latitude, though it is safe to generalize that the south is warmer. Much of the highest quality viticulture takes place on gently rolling, picturesque hillsides.

    Italy boasts more indigenous varieties than any other country—between 500 and 800, depending on whom you ask—and most wine production relies upon these native grapes. In some regions, international varieties have worked their way in, but their use is declining in popularity, especially as younger growers begun to take interest in rediscovering forgotten local specialties. Sangiovese is the most widely planted variety in the country, reaching its greatest potential in parts of Tuscany. Nebbiolo is the prized grape of Piedmont in the northwest, producing singular and age-worthy wines at its best. Other important varieties include Montepulciano, Trebbiano, Barbera, Nero d’Avola, and of course, Pinot Grigio.

    Pinot Gris/Grigio

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    One grape variety with two very distinct personas, Pinot Gris in France is rich, round, and aromatic, while Pinot Grigio in Italy is simple, crisp, and refreshing. In Italy, Pinot Grigio is grown in the mountainous regions of Trentino, Friuli, and Alto Adige in the northeast. In France it reaches its apex in Alsace. Pinots both “Gris” and “Grigio” are produced successfully in Oregon's Willamette Valley as well as parts of California, and are widely planted throughout central and eastern Europe.

    In the Glass

    Pinot Gris is naturally low in acidity, so full ripeness is necessary to achieve and showcase its signature flavors and aromas of stone fruit, citrus, honeysuckle, pear, and almond skin. Alsatian styles are aromatic, richly textured and often relatively high in alcohol. As Pinot Grigio in Italy, the style is much more subdued, light, simple, and easy to drink.

    Perfect Pairings

    Alsace is renowned for its potent food–pork, foie gras, and charcuterie. With its viscous nature, Pinot Gris fits in harmoniously with these heavy hitters. Pinot Grigio, on the other hand, with its lean, crisp, citrusy freshness, works better with simple salads, a wide range of seafood, and subtle chicken dishes.

    Sommelier Secret

    Outside of France and Italy, the decision by the producer whether to label as “Gris” or “Grigio” serves as a strong indicator as to the style of wine in the bottle—the former will typically be a richer, more serious rendition while the latter will be bright, fresh, and fun.

    VCC315_08_2008 Item# 106061

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