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Daniel Chotard Sancerre 2016

Sauvignon Blanc from Sancerre, Loire, France
    0% ABV
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    0% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Aged on the lees. Brilliant pale yellow in color with a very pure nose reminiscent of citrus and white blossoms. Refreshing and full-bodied on the palate. Typical and elegant, well-balanced with good length.

    Serve with saltwater and freshwater fish, seafood, white meats, and crottin de Chavignol goat’s cheese

    Critical Acclaim

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    Daniel Chotard

    Daniel Chotard

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    Daniel Chotard, Sancerre, Loire, France
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    Daniel Chotard is the latest in a long line of family viticulteurs stretching back for generations. His vineyard is situated on the slopes of south-west Sancerre, at Reigny, near Crézancy-en-Sancerre - an area characterised by its white, clay-chalk soils. These soils can be traced back to the Jurassic age, and their sheltered situation in the Loire valley provides a gentle climate ideal for making Sancerre wines.

    Daniel combines up-to-date technology with traditional "savoir faire" to make his Sancerre wine. He produces a quality wine, authentic and sincere, reflecting the surrounding terroir.

    Daniel produces a complete range of Sancerre wines ranging from the traditional white, through rosé to red and oak-aged red.

    The white is made with the traditional Sauvignon Blanc grape, whilst the rosés and reds are Pinot Noir.

    Sancerre

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    Marked by its charming hilltop village in the easternmost territory of the Loire, Sancerre is famous for its racy, vivacious, citrus-dominant Sauvignon blanc. Its enormous popularity in 1970s French bistros led to its success as the go-to restaurant white around the globe in the 1980s.

    While the region claims a continental climate, noted for short, hot summers and long, cold winters, variations in topography—rolling hills and steep slopes from about 600 to 1,300 feet in elevation—with great soil variations, contribute the variations in character in Sancerre Sauvignon blancs.

    In the western part of the appellation, clay and limestone soils with Kimmeridgean marne, especially in Chavignol, produce powerful wines. Moving closer to the actual town of Sancerre, soils are gravel and limestone, producing especially delicate wines. Flint (silex) soils close to the village produce particularly perfumed and age-worthy wines.

    About ten percent of the wines claiming the Sancerre appellation name are fresh and light red wines made from Pinot noir and to a lesser extent, rosés. While not typically exported in large amounts, they are well-made and attract a loyal French following.

    Sauvignon Blanc

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    A crisp, refreshing variety that equally reflects both terroir and varietal character, Sauvignon blanc is responsible for a vast array of wine styles. However, a couple of commonalities always exist—namely, zesty acidity and intense aromatics. The variety is of French provenance, and here is most important in Bordeaux and the Loire Valley. It also shines in New Zealand, California, Australia and parts of northeastern Italy. Chile and South Africa are excellent sources of high-quality, value-priced Sauvignon blanc.

    In the Glass

    From its homeland In Bordeaux, winemakers prefer to blend it with Sémillon to produce a softer, richer style. In the Loire Valley, it expresses citrus, flint and smoky flavors, especially from in Sancerre and Pouilly-Fume. Marlborough, New Zealand often produces a pungent and racy version, often reminiscent of cut grass, gooseberry and grapefruit. California produces fruity and rich oak-aged versions as well as snappy and fresh, Sauvignon blancs, which never see any oak.

    Perfect Pairings

    The freshness of Sauvignon Blanc’s flavor lends it to a range of light, summery dishes including salad, seafood and mild Asian cuisine. Sauvignon Blanc settles in comfortably at the table with notoriously difficult foods like artichokes or asparagus. When combined with Sémillon (and perhaps some oak), it can be paired with more complex seafood and chicken dishes.

    Sommelier Secret

    Along with Cabernet Franc, Sauvignon Blanc is the proud parent of Cabernet Sauvignon. That green bell pepper aroma that all three varieties share is no coincidence—it comes from a high concentration of pyrazines (an herbaceous aromatic compound) inherent to each member of the family.

    IPOPI_KL4444_2016 Item# 199062