BenMarco Expresivo 2008 Front Label
BenMarco Expresivo 2008 Front Label

BenMarco Expresivo 2008

  • RP92
  • WS90
750ML / 14.3% ABV
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  • RP92
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  • WS92
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750ML / 14.3% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Wafting aromas of ripe red currants, black cherries and mildly smoky and sweet vanilla oak. Layers of currant fruit, dense black cherry, and notes of brown spice (cocoa, nutmeg), dark chocolate, and hints of sandalwood. Keeps showing its stuff as it breathes in the glass—for folks who want the full experience and may be a bit impatient, decanting is a good idea. Perfect balance, great concentration and length, and loaded with fine, ripe tannins for having with food or for aging. This wine should also age beautifully for 10-25 years. Pairs well with a wide range of foods including grilled steak, roasted pork loin, veal, medium-strong cheeses, and most cream sauces.

Critical Acclaim

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RP 92
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2009 BenMarco Cabernet Sauvignon and 2009 BenMarco Malbec were reviewed favorably in the Argentina Value report in the previous on-line issue. Made by the Godmother of Argentina Torrontes, Susana Balbo, the 2008 BenMarco Expresivo is a blend of 50% Malbec, 20% Syrah, 15% Cabernet Sauvignon, with the balance Tannat and Petit Verdot aged for 14 months in new French and American oak. Dark ruby red in color, it displays an already complex bouquet of wood smoke, Asian spices, incense, and assorted black fruits. On the palate it is supple-textured, rich, and plush with no hard edges. There is a bit of underlying tannin in this lengthy effort which is likely to evolve for several more years. It will provide a drinking window extending from 2012 to 2023.
WS 90
Wine Spectator
Very ripe for the vintage, boasting impressive layers of raspberry, red and black currant, cherry and licorice that weave through, carried by graphite, spice and floral notes. Bright acidity is well-buried, allowing the finish to stretch out. Malbec, Syrah, Cabernet Sauvignon, Tannat and Petit Verdot. Drink now through 2011. 500 cases imported.
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BenMarco

BenMarco

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BenMarco, South America
BenMarco Susan Balboa Winery Winery Image

BenMarco is all about viticulture. Having planted more than 3,000 acres of vineyards across Argentina’s diverse terroirs, Edgardo “Edy” Del Popolo, General Manager of Susana Balbo Wines in Mendoza and head winemaker for BenMarco, is Argentina’s most knowledgeable winegrower. He has tasted almost every piece of dirt!

BenMarco wines are made with minimal intervention to allow for the purest interpretation of what’s underground on the extreme sites where the grapes for BenMarco are grown. “I try to avoid adding my influence to BenMarco wines,” Edy says. “What I really like to see is what the vines can do, without any kind of winemaking influence.”

Edy grows three red wines from three distinct, high-elevation sub-zones of Mendoza: a Malbec from Los Chacayes, a Cabernet Sauvignon from Los Árboles, and Expresivo, a red blend from Gualtallary.

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With vineyards tretching along the eastern side of the Andes Mountains from Patagonia in the south to Salta in the north, Argentina is one of the world’s largest and most dynamic wine producing countries—and most important in South America.

Since the late 20th century vineyard investments, improved winery technology and a commitment to innovation have all contributed to the country’s burgeoning image as a producer of great wines at all price points. The climate here is diverse but generally continental and agreeable, with hot, dry summers and cold snowy winters—a positive, as snow melt from the Andes Mountains is used heavily to irrigate vineyards. Grapes very rarely have any difficulty achieving full ripeness.

Argentina’s famous Mendoza region, responsible for more than 70% of Argentina’s wine production, is further divided into several sub-regions, with Luján de Cuyo and the Uco Valley most noteworthy. Red wines dominate here, especially Malbec, the country’s star variety, while Chardonnay is the most successful white.

The province of San Juan is best known for blends of Bonarda and Syrah. Torrontés is a specialty of the La Rioja and Salta regions, the latter of which is also responsible for excellent Malbecs grown at very high elevation.

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With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended red wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged resulting in a wide variety of red wine styles. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a red wine blend variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

How to Serve Red Wine

A common piece of advice is to serve red wine at “room temperature,” but this suggestion is imprecise. After all, room temperature in January is likely to be quite different than in August, even considering the possible effect of central heating and air conditioning systems. The proper temperature to aim for is 55° F to 60° F for lighter-bodied reds and 60° F to 65° F for fuller-bodied wines.

How Long Does Red Wine Last?

Once opened and re-corked, a bottle stored in a cool, dark environment (like your fridge) will stay fresh and nicely drinkable for a day or two. There are products available that can extend that period by a couple of days. As for unopened bottles, optimal storage means keeping them on their sides in a moderately humid environment at about 57° F. Red wines stored in this manner will stay good – and possibly improve – for anywhere from one year to multiple decades. Assessing how long to hold on to a bottle is a complicated science. If you are planning long-term storage of your reds, seek the advice of a wine professional.

STC931779_2008 Item# 110239

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