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Wirra Wirra Scrubby Rise Red 2014

Other Red Blends from Adelaide, Australia
    14.5% ABV
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    14.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Deep plum with a bright crimson edge. The nose is led by fresh red currants and raspberry fruits of shiraz, and balanced by the fragrant leafiness of cabernet. Juicy, succulent raspberry, blueberry and cassis sweetness surround the fine and supple tannins. A bright, medium bodied palate with length and immediate appeal.

    Try pairing this wine with baked enchiladas with chorizo, smokey beef and black bean.

    Blend: 62% Shiraz, 35% Cabernet Sauvignon, 5% Petit Verdot

    Critical Acclaim

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    Wirra Wirra

    Wirra Wirra

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    Wirra Wirra, Adelaide, Australia
    Image of winery
    Wirra Wirra Vineyards was originally established in 1894 by known South Australian eccentric and cricketer Robert Strangways Wigley. The winery prospered in its early days, producing many wines including a much acclaimed Shiraz, which was exported to England and the Empire until his death in 1926. The winery ran into disrepair and was eventually abandoned. In 1969 under the watchful eye of the late Greg Trott and his cousin Roger, the winery was rebuilt from the remnants of two walls and some slate fermenting tanks. As with all subsequent Trott endeavours, it was the sheer magnitude and unlikeliness of the project that made it so attractive.

    Adelaide

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    The Adelaide Zone refers to the super zone in South Australia containing the Mount Lofty Ranges Zone (Adelaide Hills, Adelaide Plains and Clare Valley), Fleurieu Zone (Currency Creek, Kangaroo Island, Langhorne Creek, McLaren Vale, and Southern Fleurieu) and Barossa Zone (Barossa Valley and Eden Valley).

    The Adelaide Hills region is distinguished and beautiful, offering a cool respite in the summer for Adelaide city dwellers. With vineyards planted fairly high in elevation at 1,500 to 1,800 feet, it is known for its particularly fine, citrus-driven Sauvignon blanc.

    However, Piccadilly Valley, the part of Adelaide Hills closest to the city, was first staked out by a grower named Brian Croser, in the 1970s for a cool spot to grow Chardonnay, then uncommon in Australia. Today a good amount of the Chardonnay goes to winemakers outsdie of the region for blends and not many wineries were ever permitted to build wineries here, since it is essentially an eastern suburb of the city.

    Producers experiment with other cool-climate loving aromatic varieties like Pinot gris, Viognier and Riesling. Charming sparkling wine is also possible, which is made from Pinot noir and Chardonnay. On its north side, lower, west-facing slopes make full-bodied Shiraz.

    The Adelaide Plains is a hot region northwest of the Adelaide Hills that produces simpler, value-driven wines.

    Other Red Blends

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    With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

    STC179878_2014 Item# 169764