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Wind Gap Sun Chase Pinot Noir 2013

Pinot Noir from Petaluma Gap, Sonoma Coast, Sonoma County, California
    13.5% ABV
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    13.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Intensely flavored and spicy, this red fruit dominated Pinot Noir is structured and savory and by no means sweet and syrupy. Brilliant and bright, this wine was aged in old French oak barrels as not to sweeten or mask the purity of this spectacular vineyard on the Sonoma Coast.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Wind Gap

    Wind Gap

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    Wind Gap, Petaluma Gap, Sonoma Coast, Sonoma County, California
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    Wind Gap is not about making the "perfect" wine. It's about making honest, authentic and compelling wine from special vineyard sites. What interests us about wine is what makes it different-the subtle nuances and characteristics that tell a particular wine's story, reguardless of appellation.

    We've combed the state to gather a collection of some of the moste exciting vineyards for producing the kinds of grapes we love - Cabernet from Coombsville in south Napa, Chardonnay from the dramatic limestone and granit of Chalone, Grenache from the Shale and Limestone blanketed hills of western Paso Robles, and Syrah from the windy and cold Sonoma Coast. Along the way, we've been lucky enough to meet and work along with like-minded growers who embrace the discerning farming practices we belive in.

    Interestingly enough, many of our vineyards are planted along or are directly influenced by one wind gap or another. These geological breaks in the coastal hill funnel wind inland and strongly influence the growing and ripening fo our grapes. It seemed only fitting to us that our name should celebrate the forces of nature that are shaping our wine.

    Sonoma Coast

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    A vast appellation covering Sonoma County’s Pacific coastline, the Sonoma Coast AVA runs all the way from the Mendocino County border, south to the San Pablo Bay. The region can actually be divided into two sections—the actual coastal vineyards, marked by marine soils, cool temperatures and saline ocean breezes—and the warmer, drier vineyards further inland, which are still heavily influenced by the Pacific but not quite with same intensity.

    Contained within the appellation are the much smaller Fort Ross-Seaview and Petaluma Gap AVAs.

    The Sonoma Coast is highly regarded for elegant Pinot Noir, Chardonnay, and, increasingly, cool-climate Syrah. The wines have high acidity, moderate alcohol, firm tannin, and balanced ripeness.

    Pinot Noir

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    One of the most finicky yet rewarding grapes to grow, Pinot Noir is a labor of love for many. However, the greatest red wines of Burgundy prove that it is unquestionably worth the effort. In fact, it is the only red variety permitted in Burgundy. Highly reflective of its terroir, Pinot Noir prefers calcareous soils and a cool climate, requires low yields to achieve high quality and demands a lot of attention in the vineyard and winery. It retains even more glory as an important component of Champagne as well as on its own in France’s Loire Valley and Alsace regions. This sensational grape enjoys immense international success, most notably growing in Oregon, California and New Zealand with smaller amounts in Chile, Germany (as Spätburgunder) and Italy (as Pinot Nero).

    In the Glass

    Pinot Noir is all about red fruit—strawberry, raspberry and cherry with some heftier styles delving into the red or purple plum and in the other direction, red or orange citrus. It is relatively pale in color with soft tannins and a lively acidity. With age (of which the best examples can handle an astounding amount) it can develop hauntingly alluring characteristics of fresh earth, savory spice, dried fruit and truffles.

    Perfect Pairings

    Pinot’s healthy acidity cuts through the oiliness of pink-fleshed fish like salmon and tuna but its mild mannered tannins give it enough structure to pair with all sorts of poultry: chicken, quail and especially duck. As the namesake wine of Boeuf Bourguignon, Pinot noir has proven it isn’t afraid of beef. California examples work splendidly well with barbecue and Pinot Noir is also vegetarian-friendly—most notably with any dish that features mushrooms.

    Sommelier Secret

    For administrative purposes, the region of Beaujolais is often included in Burgundy. But it is extremely different in terms of topography, soil and climate, and the important red grape here is ultimately Gamay. Truth be told, there is a tiny amount of Gamay sprinkled around the outlying parts of Burgundy (mainly in Maconnais) but it isn’t allowed with any great significance and certainly not in any Villages or Cru level wines.

    RVLWG13PNSUN_2013 Item# 280805