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William Fevre Chablis Les Preuses Grand Cru (1.5 Liter Magnum) 2010

Chardonnay from Chablis, Burgundy, France
  • RP97
0% ABV
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Winemaker Notes

Floral notes on the nose, with fruit driven hints enhanced by intense mineral notes and lightly smoky touches. Very rounded on the palate, but also full-bodied yet elegant.

Pair with fish, shellfish and other seafood, grilled or in a cream sauce. Poultry and white meat, grilled or in a cream sauce.

Critical Acclaim

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RP 97
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2010 Chablis Les Preuses combines the minerality of Valmur and the fruit of Bouguerots in a style that is immensely appealing. The wine’s balance is utterly impeccable throughout. This is one of those effortless, gracious wines that is easy to underestimate because the elements are so seamlessly woven together that nothing in particular stands out. I am blown away by the sheer balance, purity and harmony of what is in the glass. This is a great showing from Fevre and Didier Seguir.
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William Fevre

William Fevre

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William Fevre, Chablis, Burgundy, France
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With a family history dating back 250 years in the Chablis region, William Fèvre’s father was already a great wine-maker after World War II. His son William founded the Domaine de la Maladière and announced his first harvest in 1959. For many years, William Fèvre (who to this day enjoys a very good reputation as a defender of historically renowned terroirs), has worked each plot keenly and skillfully so as to make wine whose personality reflects the authenticity of the soils from which they spring.

In 1998, the venerable Henriot family from Champagne succeeded him. The Domaine was taken up with the desire to make indisputably genuine and fine wines, bringing along a very personal expertise in Chardonnay. All the efforts have but one goal – to finely express the most subtle variations in the greatest Chablis crus.

William Fèvre owns the widest array of Grands Crus and benefits from ideal conditions to produce excellent Chablis. Located on “historical” terroirs, dating from before the extension of the vineyard areas that occurred in the 1970’s, the William Fèvre Domaine is at the very heart of the vineyards, on soil that mixes marl and clay-rich lime, as well as a Kimmeridgian subsoil rich in minerals and oyster fossils that give Chablis its unique mineral character.

The source of the most racy, light and tactile, yet uniquely complex Chardonnay, Chablis, while considered part of Burgundy, actually reaches far past the most northern stretch of the Côte d’Or proper. Its vineyards cover hillsides surrounding the small village of Chablis about 100 miles north of Dijon, making it actually closer to Champagne than to Burgundy. Champagne and Chablis have a unique soil type in common called Kimmeridgian, which isn’t found anywhere else in the world except southern England. A 180 million year-old geologic formation of decomposed clay and limestone, containing tiny fossilized oyster shells, spans from the Dorset village of Kimmeridge in southern England all the way down through Champagne, and to the soils of Chablis. This soil type produces wines full of structure, austerity, minerality, salinity and finesse.

Chablis Grand Cru vineyards are all located at ideal elevations and exposition on the acclaimed Kimmeridgian soil while most of the vineyards in the outlying spots are referred to as Petit Chablis. Chablis Grand Cru, as well as some Petit Chablis, can age for many years.

Chardonnay

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One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it is grown and how it is made. While practically every country in the wine producing world grows it, Chardonnay from its Burgundian homeland produces some of the most remarkable and longest lived examples. As far as cellar potential, white Burgundy rivals the world’s other age-worthy whites like Riesling or botrytized Semillon. California is Chardonnay’s second most important home, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia and South America are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

In the Glass

When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay flavors tend towards grapefruit, lemon zest, green apple, celery leaf and wet flint, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of melon, peach and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut and spice, while malolactic fermentation imparts a soft and creamy texture.

Perfect Pairings

Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with flaky white fish with herbs, scallops, turkey breast and soft cheeses. Richer Chardonnays marry well with lobster, crab, salmon, roasted chicken and creamy sauces.

Sommelier Secret

Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. In Burgundy, the subregion of Chablis, while typically employing the use of older oak barrels, produces a similar bright and acid-driven style. Anyone who doesn't like oaky Chardonnay would likely enjoy its lighter style.

SSA145388_2010 Item# 145388