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Wattle Creek The Triple Play 2009

Rhone Red Blends from North Coast, California
  • WE91
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Winemaker Notes

This blend opens initially with powerful aromas of sweet, ripe black berries, jammy wild berries, wilted rose, notes of mocha, dark chocolate and toasty undertones. The aromas evolve with air and patience, bringing to the forefront subtle, sweet, floral notes and a rich cherry scent. This wines flavor echoes the aromas displaying ripe, juicy, vibrant wild berry and blackberries that are intense and concentrated and saturate the palate. The tannins are soft and coat the mouth, while the fruit flavors lend a pleasant sweetness. The finish is long and persistent with wonderful dark berry and earth notes that carry on. Enjoy!

Blend: 88% Syrah, 8% Petite Sirah, 4% Viognier

Critical Acclaim

WE 91
Wine Enthusiast

Wattle Creek’s best Triple Play ever. A blend of Syrah, Viognier and Petite Sirah from this cool appellation in Mendocino County, the wine is dry, medium- to full-bodied, tannic and complex, with flavors of blackberries, currants, tobacco, smoked meat, cedar and scads of black pepper. Drink now for its sheer power and joy.

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Wattle Creek

Wattle Creek

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Wattle Creek, , California
Wattle Creek
In March of 1994, a bit of Australia moved to California, and Sonoma County grew even more welcoming and friendlier. An Australian family brought its infectious love of life and exuberance to 56 acres of land just south of the small town of Cloverdale in Alexander Valley. This family, the Williams, also brought with them a zeal and fervor for wine, in particular wines from the Southern Hemisphere.

Led by Christopher and Kristine, the vineyard selection was anything but happenstance. They sought and discovered a piece of land reminiscent of the warm Barossa Valley of the land down under. Here, the perfect union of climate, soil, and geography permit the infusion of the best of Alexander Valley with Australian vitality and heritage of winemaking.

On the heels of the success of their Alexander Valley site, the family added an extraordinary piece of land in Mendocino's Yorkville Highlands. In 2001, under the guidance of a new Aussie winemaker for both estates, Michael Scholz, they released their first Mendocino Sauvignon Blanc. In the next few years the vineyard promises to produce fruit for a Chardonnay, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Shiraz as well.

This was the inception of Wattle Creek, an American winery that derives its logo and name from the yellow blossom of the Australian Wattle tree and its essence and style from Australia.

Willamette Valley

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One of Pinot Noir’s most successful New World outposts...

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One of Pinot Noir’s most successful New World outposts, the Willamette Valley is the largest and most important AVA in Oregon. With a temperate climate moderated by Pacific Ocean influence, it is perfect for cool-climate viticulture—warm and dry summers allow for steady, even ripening, and frost is rarely a risk during spring and even winter. Mountain ranges bordering three sides of the valley, particularly the Chehalem Mountains, provide the option for higher-elevation, cooler vineyard sites. The three prominent soil types here create significant difference in wine styles between vineyards and sub-AVAs—the iron-rich, basalt-based Jory volcanic soils found commonly in the Dundee Hills are rich in clay and holds water well; the chalky, sedimentary soils of Ribbon Ridge, Yamhill-Carlton, and McMinnville encourage complex root systems as vines struggle to search for water and minerals; and the silty loess found in the Chehalem Mountains, somewhere in between the other two in texture, is fertile and well-draining but erodes easily, creating challenges for growers but necessitating careful vineyard management.

The celebrated Pinot Noir of the Willamette Valley typically offers supple red fruit, especially cranberry, without the powerful punch often packed by its California counterparts. Elegance is paramount here, and fruit flavors are balanced by forest floor, wild mushroom, and dried herbs—much more in line with Burgundian examples of the variety. Chardonnay too takes its inspiration from the French motherland, focusing on tart, crisp fruit and minerality, rarely relying upon heavy new oak. Pinot Gris here is fleshy and bright, and Riesling is dry, aromatic, and citrus-focused.

Pinot Noir

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One of the most difficult yet rewarding grapes to grow...

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One of the most difficult yet rewarding grapes to grow, Pinot Noir is commonly referred to by winemakers as the “heartbreak grape.” However, the greatest red wines of Burgundy prove that it is unquestionably worth the effort. More reflective than most varieties of the land on which it is grown, Pinot Noir prefers a cool climate, requires low yields to achieve high quality, and demands care in the vineyard and lots of attention in the winery. It is an important component of Champagne and the only variety permitted in red Burgundy. Pinot Noir enjoys immense popularity internationally, most notably in Oregon, California, and New Zealand.

In the Glass

Pinot Noir Is all about red fruit—strawberry, raspberry, and cherry. It is relatively pale in color with soft tannins and lively acidity. It ranges in body from very light to the heavier side of medium, typically landing somewhere in the middle—giving it extensive possibilities for food pairing. With age (of which the best examples can handle an astounding amount), it can develop hauntingly beautiful characteristics of fresh earth, autumn leaves, and truffles.

Perfect Pairings

Pinot’s healthy acidity cuts through the oiliness of pink-fleshed fish like salmon, ocean trout, and tuna. Its mild mannered tannins don’t fight with spicy food, and give it enough structure to pair with all sorts of poultry—chicken, quail, and especially duck. As the namesake wine of Boeuf Bourguignon, it can even match with heavier fare. Pinot Noir is also very vegetarian-friendly—most notably with any dish that features mushrooms.

Sommelier Secret

Pinot Noir is dangerously drinkable, highly addictive, and has a bad habit of emptying the wallet. Look for affordable but still delicious examples from Germany (as Spätburgunder), Italy (as Pinot Nero), Chile, New Zealand, and France’s Loire Valley and Alsace regions.

YNG741725_2009 Item# 116862

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