Veuve Clicquot Vintage Brut Rose 2004 Front Label
Veuve Clicquot Vintage Brut Rose 2004 Front LabelVeuve Clicquot Vintage Brut Rose 2004 Front Bottle ShotVeuve Clicquot Vintage Brut Rose 2004 Back Bottle Shot

Veuve Clicquot Vintage Brut Rose 2004

  • W&S93
  • WS92
  • WE91
750ML / 12% ABV
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  • JS94
  • W&S93
  • WS93
  • WE92
  • W&S92
  • RP92
  • W&S92
  • W&S92
  • WS91
  • W&S93
  • WS92
  • WE90
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750ML / 12% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The Vintage Rose 2004 offers a deep pink color with the highlights of copper and delicate, light effervescence. The nose, extremely elegant, at first reveals flavors of ripe red fruits that burst on the tongue, before gradually giving way to violets, lilacs and light "pastry" notes. A discreet touch of ground coffee can also be distinguished. The attack is forthright and energetic.

This generous wine offers an astonishingly long and subtle finish. It is extremely complex and is distinguished by great freshness. On the palate, strong notes of fruit recall the refined nose. The finish is surprising in is persistence.

Critical Acclaim

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W&S 93
Wine & Spirits
This wine gains its color from the addition of still red wine, which also points up the vinous, red-fruited flavor. Underneath, the structure is bone-white, its mineral acidity driving the wine forward with the focused tension of limestone-grown fruit. Spicy and satisfying, like a fresh, evanescent Burgundy, this is delicious to drink now and has a long life ahead.
WS 92
Wine Spectator
A vintage Champagne, close to an aperitif in style, showing fine balance, delicate texture and well-knit, bright acidity. Features a pretty palate of raspberry, spiced apple, biscuit, ginger and lemon zest notes. Drink now through 2027
WE 91
Wine Enthusiast
Still very young, with the crispest of red currant fruits. There are almond and quince flavors to go with the raspberry juice acidity. At this stage, the dosage is not full integrated, showing an awkward final sweetness.
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Veuve Clicquot

Veuve Clicquot

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Veuve Clicquot, France
Veuve Clicquot Learn More About Veuve Cliquot Winery Video

Learn about Veuve Clicquot, the history of the brand, its innovative winemaking techniques, and its signature Veuve Clicquot Yellow Label Brut Champagne. 


History of Veuve Clicquot

Veuve Clicquot, now one of the largest Champagne Houses, was founded in 1772 by Philippe Clicquot under the label "Clicquot". After establishing the brand throughout Europe, Russia and the United States, Philippe was joined by his son, François Clicquot, at the head of the House in 1798. Seven years later, following his untimely death, François’ young widow, Barbe Ponsardin, took over the family business at just 27 years old. The House would subsequently be renamed in her honor: ‘Veuve Clicquot’ means ‘The Widow Clicquot.’


Innovating Champagne Production

Over the course of her lifetime, Madame Clicquot (Barbe Ponsardin), developed three of the most important innovations in Champagne that are still practiced today. First, in 1810 Veuve Clicquot produced the first vintage wine in Champagne, which otherwise produced non-vintage blends. Second, in 1816 Madame Clicquot invented the riddling table to clarify Veuve Clicquot champagne, and by doing so, she improved both the quality and finesse of the wines. Riddling is now fundamental to ‘La Methode Traditionelle’ (the traditional Champagne production method) and is emulated around the world. Finally, in 1818 Madame Clicquot created the first rose champagne made through ‘assemblage’, a method where white wines are blended with red wines.


Veuve Clicquot Yellow Label Brut

The distinctive, 90+ rated, Veuve Clicquot Yellow Label Brut has been in production since 1877. It is distinguished by the dominance of Pinot Noir in its blend, which gives strength, complexity and elegance to the champagne.


Veuve Clicquot Pronunciation: 

vœv kliko / vuhv klee-koh


100% of Veuve Clicquot vineyards use sustainable viticulture. 

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Associated with luxury, celebration, and romance, the region, Champagne, is home to the world’s most prized sparkling wine. In order to bear the label, ‘Champagne’, a sparkling wine must originate from this northeastern region of France—called Champagne—and adhere to strict quality standards. Made up of the three towns Reims, Épernay, and Aÿ, it was here that the traditional method of sparkling wine production was both invented and perfected, birthing a winemaking technique as well as a flavor profile that is now emulated worldwide.

Well-drained, limestone and chalky soil defines much of the region, which lend a mineral component to its wines. Champagne’s cold, continental climate promotes ample acidity in its grapes but weather differences from year to year can create significant variation between vintages. While vintage Champagnes are produced in exceptional years, non-vintage cuvées are produced annually from a blend of several years in order to produce Champagnes that maintain a consistent house style.

With nearly negligible exceptions, . These can be blended together or bottled as individual varietal Champagnes, depending on the final style of wine desired. Chardonnay, the only white variety, contributes freshness, elegance, lively acidity and notes of citrus, orchard fruit and white flowers. Pinot Noir and its relative Pinot Meunier, provide the backbone to many blends, adding structure, body and supple red fruit flavors. Wines with a large proportion of Pinot Meunier will be ready to drink earlier, while Pinot Noir contributes to longevity. Whether it is white or rosé, most Champagne is made from a blend of red and white grapes—and uniquely, rosé is often produce by blending together red and white wine. A Champagne made exclusively from Chardonnay will be labeled as ‘blanc de blancs,’ while ones comprised of only red grapes are called ‘blanc de noirs.’

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What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

How is sparkling rosé wine made?

There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

SOU245260_2004 Item# 121307

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