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Uvaggio Barbera 2010

Barbera from Lodi, California
    13.5% ABV
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    13.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    This wine is rich and structured; bright berry aromas and flavors, plus stone fruit flavors of cherries and plums; which is followed by a lively, fruity and clean finish.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Uvaggio

    Uvaggio

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    Uvaggio, Lodi, California
    Uvaggio is the result of two guys who represent a triple threat: too much experience, a low threshold for boredom and a desire to do something unique, which is why we make wines in California with grape varieties indigenous to Italy. In the past we have made Arneis, Nebbiolo, Sangiovese, even a Vin Santo. Our current portfolio includes Barbera, Moscato, Primitivo and Vermentino. Our theory is simple: if California has a climate perfect for growing Mediterranean varietals, why not take advantage of it?

    Based on our theory - if we grow the right grape in the right place, we can manage to get by with our respective degrees in psychology and geography. (If one of us gets lost then other can figure out why.) However, when you grow grapes in the wrong place, you probably need a Master's Degree from UC Davis to make the wine taste good (if you are lucky). We think we have found the right places in Lodi for growing our grapes and urge you to discover this for yourself and try our wines.

    Simply put - we are passionate about wine and we craft ours for people who want to experience something different than your typical California product. While our experience is well steeped in California's traditions, our product is contemporary. We produce these wines somewhat anonymously, relatively inexpensively and eschew the corporate, cookie cutter approach.

    Our wines are for people who appreciate expressive flavors delivered with a classic style. You will not read anything about "the right wine is the wine you like” or “find the wine you like and stick with it." You will not find wines from Uvaggio with 16% alcohol and residual sugar (unless, of course, it is intentional) in our portfolio. Our whites are fresh, crisp, dry and rarely exceed 12.5% alcohol. Our barrel-aged reds are rarely over 14.5% alcohol.

    Positioned between the San Francisco Bay and the Sierra Nevada mountain range, the Lodi appellation, while relatively far inland, is able to maintain a classic Mediterranean climate featuring warm, sunny days and cool evenings. This is because the appellation is uniquely situated at the end of the Sacramento River Delta, which brings chilly, afternoon “delta breezes” to the area during the growing season.

    Lodi is a premier source of 100+ year old ancient Zinfandel vineyards—some dating back as far as 1888! With low yields of small berries, these heritage vines produce complex and bold wines, concentrated in rich and voluptuous, dark fruit.

    But Lodi doesn’t just produce Zinfandel; in fact, the appellation produces high quality wines from over 100 different grape varieties. Among them are Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Chardonnay and Sauvignon blanc as well as some of California's more rare and unique grapes. Lodi is recognized as an ideal spot for growing Spanish varieties like Albarino and Tempranillo, Portugese varieties—namely Touriga Nacional—as well as many German, Italian and French varieties.

    Soil types vary widely among Lodi’s seven sub-appellations (Cosumnes River, Alta Mesa, Deer Creek Hills, Borden Ranch, Jahant, Clements Hills and Mokelumne River). The eastern hills are clay-based and rocky and in the west, along the Mokelumne and Cosumnes Rivers, sandy and mineral-heavy soils support the majority of Lodi’s century-old own-rooted Zinfandel vineyards. Unique to Lodi are pink Rocklin-Jahant loam soils, mainly found in the Jahant sub-appellation.

    Friendly, approachable and full of juicy red fruit, Barbera produces wines in a wide range of styles, from youthful, fresh and fruity to serious, structured and age-worthy. Piedmont is the most famous source of Barbera, but it is also planted in a few nearby Italian provinces and remains one of the most widely planted varieties in the country. Barbera actually can adapt to many climates and enjoys success in California—particularly in the Sierra Foothills—and some southern hemisphere wine regions.

    In the Glass

    Barbera is typically marked by flavors of red cherry, raspberry or blackberry and backed by a signature zingy acidity. Warmer sites produce Barberas with intensely ripe fruit and complex notes of cocoa, savory spice, anise and nutmeg. Cooler sites will produce a lighter Barbera with more finesse and intriguing notes of cranberry, graphite, smoke, lavender and violet.

    Perfect Pairings

    Barbera’s prominent acidity makes it a natural match with tomato-based dishes, making it an easy pairing with a wide array of Italian cuisine. It works just as well with lighter red meat dishes, hamburgers or barbecue.

    Sommelier Secret

    In the past it wasn’t common or even accepted to age Barbera in oak but today both styles—oaked and unoaked—abound, at least in Piedmont. In fact, many Piemontese producers today still make a deliciously pure, fruity and unoaked version, intended for earlier consumption. The wine world didn't realize Barbera's potential until the work of Giacomo Bologna in Asti in the 1960s. His debut of the barrique-aged Barbera called Bricco dell’Uccellone revealed this grape's true potential. Many of the better bottlings of Piemontese Barbera can age gracefully for 10-15 years or more.

    HNYUVABAR10C_2010 Item# 140679