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Tournon Mathilda Rose 2016

Rosé from Australia
    0% ABV
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    0% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Pale salmon color. Mixture of bright red fruits, predominantly stawberry and raspberry with grenadite aromas and some delicate peach notes. Frank attack with refreshing acidity. Light and crisp with subtle minerality to complement the red fruit aromas. A light, cleansing finish.

    Perfect to pair with smoked salmon, grilled fish and other light dishes, or enjoyed on its own.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Tournon

    Tournon

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    Tournon, Australia
    Seeking excellence in the land Down Under, in 2009 Michel Chapoutier bought two new vineyards (Shays Flat Estate and Landsborough Valley Estate) in the Victorian Pyrenees to set up the fully owned Domaine Tournon. Michel recognized two unique terroirs that would allow him to make distinctive wines utilizing the Syrah/Shiraz grape that originates in his homeland. A southern extension of the Great Dividing Range, The Pyrenees foothills and ranges create a remarkable diversity of microclimates and soils that provide wealth of variety for winemakers. The cool weather patterns and unique soil in this region are an ideal place for the development of Chapoutier’s biodynamic winegrowing philosophy, and of extending Rhône traditions. Like in Hermitage, Michel's challenge is to show the diversity of this area by producing racy Shiraz from different type of soils.

    Australia

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    A large, climatically diverse country producing just about every wine style imaginable, Australia is not just a source of blockbuster Shiraz or inexpensive wine with cute labels, though both can certainly be found here. Australia has a grand winemaking history and some of the oldest vines on the planet, along with a huge range of landscapes and climates; it is impossible to make generalizations about Australian wine. Most regions are concentrated in the south of the country with those inland experiencing warm, dry weather, and those in more coastal areas receiving humid and tropical, or maritime weather patterns. Australia has for several decades been at the forefront of winemaking technology and has widely adopted the use of screwcaps, even for some premium and ultra-premium bottles.

    Shiraz is indeed Australia’s most celebrated and widely planted variety, typically producing bold, supple reds with sweet, jammy fruit and performing best in the Barossa and Hunter Valleys. Cabernet Sauvignon is often blended with Shiraz, and also shines on its own particularly in Coonawarra and Margaret River. Grenache and Mourvèdre (often locally referred to as Mataro) are also popular, both on their own and alongside Shiraz in Rhône blends. Chardonnay is common throughout the country and made in a wide range of styles. Sauvignon Blanc has recently surged in popularity to compete with New Zealand’s distinctive version, and Semillon is often utilized as its blending partner, or in the Hunter Valley, on its own to make complex, age-worthy whites. Riesling thrives in the cool-climate Clare and Eden Valleys. Sticky-sweet fortified wine Rutherglen Muscat is a beloved regional specialty of Victoria. Thanks to the country’s relatively agreeable climate throughout and the openness of its people, experimentation is common and ongoing, and there are a vast array of intriguing varieties to be found.

    Rosé Wine

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    Whether it’s playful and fun or savory and serious, most rosé today is not your grandmother’s White Zinfandel, though that category remains strong. Pink wine has recently become quite trendy, and this time around it’s commonly quite dry. It is produced throughout the world from a vast array of grape varieties, but the most successful sources are California, southern France (particularly Provence), and parts of Spain and Italy.

    Since the pigment in red wines comes from keeping fermenting juice in contact with the grape skins for an extended period, it follows that a pink wine can be made using just a brief period of skin contact—usually just a couple of days. The resulting color will depend on the grape variety and the winemaking style, ranging from pale salmon to deep magenta. These wines are typically fresh and fruity, fermented at cool temperatures in stainless steel to preserve the primary aromas and flavors. Most rosé, with a few notable exceptions, should be drunk rather young, within a few years of the vintage.

    MSW30186704_2016 Item# 184531