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Tenuta Sette Ponti Oreno 2015

Bordeaux Red Blends from Tuscany, Italy
  • JS98
  • V95
  • WS94
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  • W&S92
14.5% ABV
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4.3 14 Ratings
14.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Oreno, wich takes its name from the river that crosses the estate and the hamiet where the farmhouse is found, is the estate’s flagship wine. Fruit of the blend of Merlot structure and Cabernet Sauvignon class, brought together with the elegance of Petit Verdot, it expresses best the potential of the territory and the Moretti Cuseri family’s idea of wine.

The wine is ruby red with violet reflections and spicy aromas of blackberry. On the palate, ripe berries lead to spices andsweet oak on a full body with firm tannic structure.

A delicious companion with full flavored meats, game, roasted and braised red meat.

Blend: 50% Merlot, 40% Cabernet Sauvignon, 10% Petit Verdot

Critical Acclaim

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JS 98
James Suckling
Plenty of blackcurrant, blackberry and dark chocolate character with oyster shell and walnut undertones. Full body, extremely tight and structured with blueberry and light vanilla and coffee highlights. A gorgeous Oreno. Give this wine two or three years to come together.
V 95
Vinous
The 2015 Oreno is fabulous. Rich, sumptuous and yet very much medium in body, the 2015 has it all going on. Silky tannins and juicy, pliant fruit add to the wine's considerable appeal. Succulent dark cherry, plum, chocolate, mocha and licorice infuse this racy, showy Tuscan red. The 2015 is one of the best vintages of Oreno I have tasted of late.
WS 94
Wine Spectator
A swath of tannins coats the finish. Black cherry, black currant and mineral flavors hold court. Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Petit Verdot. Best from 2019 through 2032.
RP 93
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2015 Oreno is Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon and Petit Verdot. This nicely balanced effort shows rich color saturation and thick lines. The robust-blended red exhibits black fruit flavors followed by spice, tobacco and crushed granite or limestone. The bouquet is layered and deep. In terms of mouthfeel, the wine offers lots of density and power. It is firm and powerful and the tannins will require another few years of cellar aging before they soften. Oreno likes a warm vintage and it gets that in 2015.
W&S 92
Wine & Spirits
The 2015 Oreno balances pillowy purple fruit with cool mineral tones in a wine that feels fresh and precise. With its vibrant acidity, black-peppercorn spice and ample tannins, it has a coiled tension that calls for a few years in the cellar.
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Tenuta Sette Ponti

Tenuta Sette Ponti

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Tenuta Sette Ponti, Tuscany, Italy
Image of winery

The estate of Sette Ponti lies in the heart of the Chianti zone, fifteen miles northwest of the city of Arezzo just past the village of San Giustino Valdarno. The Via del Monte, known locally as the Via dei Sette Ponti, leads into a beautiful hidden valley and to the estate. The name Sette Ponti, or "seven bridges," refers to the seven bridges crossing the Arno River on the road from Arezzo to Florence. Erected in the mid 13th century, it took nearly forty years to build, and is perceptible in the right far background of Leonardo DaVinci's Mona Lisa.

Tenuta Sette Ponti, is, like many Tuscan estates, multi-faceted. The 750-acre property supports livestock and mixed agriculture, and although viticulture is not new to the estate, winemaking is; the yield of the property's vineyards was until 1997 sold to various respected Tuscan wine producers, among them Piero Antinori. Dr. Moretti's enjoyment of wine led him to ask Antinori if the estate vineyards could produce great wines, and Antinori thought they could. The estate has since been transformed through the consultation of respected oenologist Carlo Ferrini and his assistant, Gioia Cresti; Gilbert Bouvet, one of France's most skilled viticulturalists; and agronomist Benedetto d'Anna.

One of the most iconic Italian regions for wine, scenery and history, Tuscany is the world’s most important outpost for the Sangiovese grape. Ranging in style from fruity and simple to complex and age-worthy, Sangiovese makes up a significant percentage of plantings here, with the white Trebbiano Toscano coming in second.

Within Tuscany, many esteemed wines have their own respective sub-zones, including Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. The climate is Mediterranean and the topography consists mostly of picturesque rolling hills, scattered with vineyards.

Sangiovese at its simplest produces straightforward pizza-friendly wines with bright and juicy red fruit, but at its best it shows remarkable complexity and ageability. Top-quality Sangiovese-based wines can be expressive of a range of characteristics such as sour cherry, balsamic, dried herbs, leather, fresh earth, dried flowers, anise and tobacco. Brunello expresses well the particularities of vintage variations and is thus popular among collectors. Chianti is associated with tangy and food-friendly dry wines at various price points. A more recent phenomenon as of the 1970s is the “Super Tuscan”—a wine made from international grape varieties like Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Syrah, with or without Sangiovese. These are common in Tuscany’s coastal regions like Bolgheri, Val di Cornia, Carmignano and the island of Elba.

Bordeaux Blends

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One of the world’s most classic and popular styles of red wine, Bordeaux-inspired blends have spread from their homeland in France to nearly every corner of the New World, especially in California, Washington and Australia. Typically based on either Cabernet Sauvignon or Merlot and supported by Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot, these are sometimes referred to in the US as “Meritage” blends. In Bordeaux itself, Cabernet Sauvignon dominates in wines from the Left Bank of the Gironde River, while the Right Bank focuses on Merlot. Often, blends from outside the region are classified as being inspired by one or the other.

In the Glass

Cabernet-based, Left-Bank-styled wines are typically more tannic and structured, while Merlot-based wines modeled after the Right Bank are softer and suppler. Cabernet Franc can add herbal notes, while Malbec and Petit Verdot contribute color and structure. Wines from Bordeaux lean towards a highly structured and earthy style whereas New World areas (as in the ones named above) tend to produce bold and fruit-forward blends. Either way, Bordeaux red blends generally have aromas and flavors of black currant, cedar, plum, graphite, and violet, with more red fruit flavors when Merlot makes up a high proportion of the blend.

Perfect Pairings

Since Bordeaux red blends are often quite structured and tannic, they pair best with hearty, flavorful and fatty meat dishes. Any type of steak makes for a classic pairing. Equally welcome with these wines would be beef brisket, pot roast, braised lamb or smoked duck.

Sommelier Secret

While the region of Bordeaux is limited to a select few approved grape varieties in specified percentages, the New World is free to experiment. Bordeaux blends in California may include equal amounts of Cabernet Franc and Malbec, for example. Occassionally a winemaker might add a small percentage of a non-Bordeaux variety, such as Syrah or Petite Sirah for a desired result.

RRM9682944_2015 Item# 207372