Taittinger Comtes de Champagne Rose (1.5 Liter Magnum) 2005 Front Label
Taittinger Comtes de Champagne Rose (1.5 Liter Magnum) 2005 Front Label

Taittinger Comtes de Champagne Rose (1.5 Liter Magnum) 2005

  • RP94
  • CG94
  • W&S93
  • WS93
1500ML / 12.3% ABV
Other Vintages
  • RP95
  • WS93
  • W&S93
  • WE95
  • RP94
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5.0 9 Ratings
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5.0 9 Ratings
1500ML / 12.3% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Comtes de Champagne Rose 2005 is a rich rose color, with touches of violet. The bubbles are extraordinarily fine, rising vigorously in the glass, forming a wonderfully fine necklace of mousse. The nose affirms intense aromas of ripe, sweet fruit, including crystallised strawberries, quince jelly, violet sweets and pears in syrup. There are hints of the cooked fruit aromas of plum tart. The mid-palate confirms the initial aromas of sweet quince jelly, and develops richness with the flavors of fresh figs.

A suitable accompaniment to light cured meats, veal, lamb dishes and ribs as well as fruit salad and berry desserts.

Blend: 70% Pinot Noir, 30% Chardonnay

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
RP 94
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2005 Brut Rose Comtes de Champagne is rich, round and seductive in this vintage. Warm and resonant, the 2005 blossoms in all directions with gorgeous aromatics and expressive, generous fruit. I generally prefer more vibrant vintages for the estate's Rose, especially for aging, but immediate accessibility is one of the undisputed attributes of the 2005.
CG 94
Connoisseurs' Guide
Inviting from first sniff to lasting finish, and hitting the expected marks at every stop along the way, this lovely effort is both light and lively with a surprising burst of cherryish fruit and complex in its toasty, yeasty, chalky, somewhat creamy aromas. Perfectly formed small, suitably insistent bubbles frame a bright, vital wine whose fine balance and energy carry its elegant flavors into a long, persistent finish. It may be dear in price, but it is a wine to choose for the best occasions.
W&S 93
Wine & Spirits
Delicate red fruit scents fill this clean, elegant rose, its tart strawberry flavors lasting, harmonious, glowing with light fruit sweetness. With its freshness and refinement, this is a mouthwatering match for seared duck breast or roast squab.
WS 93
Wine Spectator
Lightly toasty and creamy in texture, this graceful rosé offers a firm backbone of acidity and rich flavors of raspberry coulis, dried strawberry, mille-feuille and graphite.
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Taittinger

Champagne Taittinger

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Champagne Taittinger, France
Champagne Taittinger Winery Video

Champagne Taittinger was established in 1931 by Pierre Taittinger on the foundations of Forest-Forneaux, itself established in 1734 and the third-oldest wine producing house of Champagne. Taittinger is today proprietor of approximately 600 acres of vines among which are included parcels in the one hundred - percent rated villages of Cramant and Avize in the Cote des Blancs; and Bouzy, Mailly, Ambonnay and Verzenay in the Montagne de Reims. The Taittinger Estate is one of the three most extensive in the Champagne district, and the firm's major holdings in Chardonnay vineyards are the physical expression of the Taittinger philosophy and style.

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Champagne

France

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Associated with luxury, celebration, and romance, the region, Champagne, is home to the world’s most prized sparkling wine. In order to bear the label, ‘Champagne’, a sparkling wine must originate from this northeastern region of France—called Champagne—and adhere to strict quality standards. Made up of the three towns Reims, Épernay, and Aÿ, it was here that the traditional method of sparkling wine production was both invented and perfected, birthing a winemaking technique as well as a flavor profile that is now emulated worldwide.

Well-drained, limestone and chalky soil defines much of the region, which lend a mineral component to its wines. Champagne’s cold, continental climate promotes ample acidity in its grapes but weather differences from year to year can create significant variation between vintages. While vintage Champagnes are produced in exceptional years, non-vintage cuvées are produced annually from a blend of several years in order to produce Champagnes that maintain a consistent house style.

With nearly negligible exceptions, . These can be blended together or bottled as individual varietal Champagnes, depending on the final style of wine desired. Chardonnay, the only white variety, contributes freshness, elegance, lively acidity and notes of citrus, orchard fruit and white flowers. Pinot Noir and its relative Pinot Meunier, provide the backbone to many blends, adding structure, body and supple red fruit flavors. Wines with a large proportion of Pinot Meunier will be ready to drink earlier, while Pinot Noir contributes to longevity. Whether it is white or rosé, most Champagne is made from a blend of red and white grapes—and uniquely, rosé is often produce by blending together red and white wine. A Champagne made exclusively from Chardonnay will be labeled as ‘blanc de blancs,’ while ones comprised of only red grapes are called ‘blanc de noirs.’

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What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

How is sparkling rosé wine made?

There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

ALL4316020_2005 Item# 121947

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