Processing Your Order...

Search for ""

Update your browser to enjoy all that has to offer.

It's easy to update and using the latest version
of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

Yes, Update Now

New Customers Save $30 off $100+* with code MARCHNEW30

New Customers Save $30* with code MARCHNEW30

*New customers only. One-time use per customer. Order must be placed by 3/31/2018. The $30 discount is given for a single order with a minimum of $100 excluding shipping and tax. Items with pricing ending in .97 are excluded and will not count toward the minimum required. Discount does not apply to corporate orders, gift certificates, StewardShip membership fees, select Champagne brands, Riedel glassware, fine and rare wine, and all bottles 3.0 liters or larger. No other promotion codes, coupon codes or corporate discounts may be applied to order.

Due to state regulations, we cannot ship wine to California

Tablas Creek Cotes de Tablas Rouge 2009

Rhone Red Blends from Central Coast, California
  • WS93
14.5% ABV
  • V92
  • RP90
  • V92
  • WE92
  • WS90
  • RP90
  • WE90
  • RP93
  • RP89
  • RP91
  • RP91
  • RP90
  • RP92
All Vintages
Ships Sat, Mar 31
Limit 0 bottles per customer
Sold in increments of 0
Currently Unavailable $34.99
Try the
34 99
34 99
Save $0.00 (0%)
Add to Cart
Limit Reached
3.0 1 Ratings
Vintage Alert
Alert me when new vintages are available
Rate for better recommendations
(256 characters remaining)
Cancel Save

3.0 1 Ratings
14.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

#37 Wine Spectator Top 100 of 2011

The 2009 Côtes de Tablas shows a rich, minty nose with dark chocolate, cherry, leather, licorice and crushed rock. The mouth explodes with dark cherry, with nice chalky Grenache tannins giving firmness. The very long finish lingers with flavors of licorice, spice and cherry liqueur. Our most concentrated Côtes de Tablas ever; it should drink well young but also cellar happily for a decade.

Pairs well with grilled steaks, pasta with meat sauces, rich beef stews, spicy sausages.

Blend: 43% Grenache, 24% Syrah, 18% Counoise, 15% Mourvèdre

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
WS 93
Wine Spectator
Charmingly fruity, supple and fun to drink, exhibiting ripe plum, black cherry and wild berry fruit that's smooth and layered, with a long, fruity finish. Grenache, Syrah, Counoise and Mourvedre. Drink now through 2017. 1,050 cases made.
View More
Tablas Creek

Tablas Creek Vineyard

View all wine
Tablas Creek Vineyard, Central Coast, California
2009 Cotes de Tablas Rouge
The Perrins of Chateau de Beaucastel and Robert Haas, their importer since 1970, founded Tablas Creek Vineyard in 1990. They chose their 1600-foot elevation site in West Paso Robles' Las Tablas because of its chalky clay soils and its climate similar to the southern Rhone Valley. They imported selected French cuttings of Mourvedre, Grenache, Syrah and Counoise and multiplied, grafted and planted their own vines, which they farm organically. This blended wine, in the image of Chateauneuf-du-Pape, is 100% estate-grown and bottled.

Central Coast

View all wine

The largest and perhaps most varied of California’s wine-growing regions, the Central Coast produces the majority of the state's wine. The sprawling district covers most of the vineyard land between San Francisco and Santa Barbara from the coast inland nearly all the way to the Central Valley. Encompassing an extremely diverse array of climates, soil types, and wine styles, it contains many smaller sub-AVAs, including Monterey, Paso Robles, Santa Ynez Valley, Santa Maria Valley, and Santa Cruz Mountains.

Just about every major international grape variety is planted within this vast AVA, from Pinot Noir and Chardonnay to Cabernet Sauvignon and Zinfandel. A significant proportion of the region’s produce is generic, inexpensive bulk wine, but the Central Coast is also home to many small, artisanal wineries crafting unique, high-quality wines, as well as everything in between.

Rhône Blends

View all wine

With bold fruit flavors and accents of spice, Rhône red blends originated in France’s Southern Rhône valley and have become popular in Priorat, Washington, South Australia, and California’s Central Coast. In the Rhône itself, 19 grape varieties are permitted for use, but many of these blends, are based on Grenache and supported by Syrah and Mourvèdre, earning the nickname “GSM blends.” Côtes du Rhône and Châteauneuf-du-Pape are perhaps the best-known outposts for these wines. Other varieties that may be found in Rhône blends include Carignan, Cinsault, and Counoise.

In the Glass

The taste profile of a Rhône blend will vary according to its individual components, as each variety brings something different to the glass. Grenache, which often forms the base of these blends, is the lightest in color but contributes plenty of ripe red fruit, a plush texture, and often high levels of alcohol. Syrah supplies darker fruit flavors, along with savory, spicy, and meaty notes. Mourvèdre is responsible for a floral perfume as well as body, tannin, and a healthy dose of color. New World examples will lie further along the fruit-forward end of the spectrum, while those from the Old World taste and smell much earthier, often with a “barnyard” character that is attractive to many fans of these wines.

Perfect Pairings

Rhône red blends typically make for very food-friendly wines. Depending on the weight and alcohol level, these can work with a wide variety of meat-based dishes—they play equally well with beef, pork, duck, lamb, or game. With their high acidity, these wines are best-matched with salty or fatty foods, and can handle the acidity of tomato sauce in pizza or pasta. Braised beef cheeks, grilled lamb sausages, or roasted squab are all fine pairings.

Sommelier Secret

Some regions like to put their own local spin on the Rhône red blend—for example, in Australia’s Barossa Valley, Shiraz is commonly blended with Cabernet Sauvignon to add structure, tannin, and a long finish. Grenache-based blends from Priorat often include Carignan (known locally as Cariñena) and Syrah, but also international varieties like Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon. In California, anything goes, and it is not uncommon to see Petite Sirah, Zinfandel, or even Tempranillo make an appearance.

PBC2278646_2009 Item# 109252