Processing Your Order...

Search for ""

Update your browser to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to update and using the latest version
of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

Yes, Update Now
Flat front label of wine
Flat front label of wineFront shot of wine bottle

Stolpman Vineyards Sauvignon Blanc 2016

Sauvignon Blanc from Ballard Canyon, Santa Barbara, Central Coast, California
    12.5% ABV
    All Vintages
    Currently Unavailable $19.99
    Try the
    21
    19 99
    Save $1.01 (5%)
    Ships Tomorrow
    Limit 0 bottles per customer
    Sold in increments of 0
    Add to Cart
    1
    Limit Reached
    0.0 0 Ratings
    My Wine Share
    Vintage Alert
    Alert me when new vintages are available
    Rate for better recommendations
    (256 characters remaining)
    Cancel Save

    0.0 0 Ratings
    12.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Crisp, yet smooth and already enticingly pleasurable, the 2016 Sauvignon Blanc fits the bill for a fresh, pure-driven white. Over the coming months after release, the Sauvignon Blanc gains further weight and texture, with Limestone-driven chalk beginning to shine through the wine's fruit purity. For now, a primary spectrum of meyer lemon, fresh lemonade, and lemont custard shine ina concentrated yet softly balanced body. Surely the ultimate Ceviche wine.

    Critical Acclaim

    All Vintages
    Stolpman Vineyards

    Stolpman Vineyards

    View all wine
    Stolpman Vineyards, Ballard Canyon, Santa Barbara, Central Coast, California
    Image of winery
    Stolpman Vineyards is located in Ballard Canyon, just 15 miles from the coast. The location lends to warm days with cool nights. Tom and Marilyn Stolpman planted their first grapes in 1992 and today have 120 planted acres. The vineyard continues to be a dynamic location for the planting of Syrah, Sangiovese and Rousanne. Jeff Newton and Larry Finkle, along with our Vineyard Manager, Ruben Solorzano, have recently planted high density vines and continue to explore the standards of what it takes to make the best quality grapes from southern exposed vines and limestone soil.

    Ballard Canyon

    View all wine

    Accounting for only ten percent of the greater Santa Ynez AVA, Ballard Canyon’s north-south orientation provides an ideal pattern of sunshine and martime fog for producing excellent Syrah. While Syrah is planted to half of the total AVA acreage, an additional third is dedicated to other Rhone varieties.

    Sauvignon Blanc

    View all wine

    A crisp, refreshing variety that equally reflects both terroir and varietal character, Sauvignon blanc is responsible for a vast array of wine styles. However, a couple of commonalities always exist—namely, zesty acidity and intense aromatics. The variety is of French provenance, and here is most important in Bordeaux and the Loire Valley. It also shines in New Zealand, California, Australia and parts of northeastern Italy. Chile and South Africa are excellent sources of high-quality, value-priced Sauvignon blanc.

    In the Glass

    From its homeland In Bordeaux, winemakers prefer to blend it with Sémillon to produce a softer, richer style. In the Loire Valley, it expresses citrus, flint and smoky flavors, especially from in Sancerre and Pouilly-Fume. Marlborough, New Zealand often produces a pungent and racy version, often reminiscent of cut grass, gooseberry and grapefruit. California produces fruity and rich oak-aged versions as well as snappy and fresh, Sauvignon blancs, which never see any oak.

    Perfect Pairings

    The freshness of Sauvignon Blanc’s flavor lends it to a range of light, summery dishes including salad, seafood and mild Asian cuisine. Sauvignon Blanc settles in comfortably at the table with notoriously difficult foods like artichokes or asparagus. When combined with Sémillon (and perhaps some oak), it can be paired with more complex seafood and chicken dishes.

    Sommelier Secret

    Along with Cabernet Franc, Sauvignon Blanc is the proud parent of Cabernet Sauvignon. That green bell pepper aroma that all three varieties share is no coincidence—it comes from a high concentration of pyrazines (an herbaceous aromatic compound) inherent to each member of the family.

    STLSWSBBC16D_2016 Item# 178334