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St. Mary's Bells & Whistles Red 2004

Barbera from Barossa Valley, Barossa, Australia
  • RP88
13.5% ABV
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2.4 17 Ratings
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2.4 17 Ratings
13.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The Bells and Whistles is a blend made from 55% Cab/Sav, 20% Shiraz, 15% Cab Franc and 10% Merlot grapes grown at St Mary's vineyards. The palate is balanced with a rich smooth persistence.

Critical Acclaim

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RP 88
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
A blend of 55% Cabernet Sauvignon, 20% Shiraz, 15% Cabernet Franc, and 10% Merlot, the 2004 Bells and Whistles reveals more complexity, texture, and overall completeness.
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St. Mary's

St. Mary's

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St. Mary's, Barossa Valley, Barossa, Australia
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St Marys is a boutique, family owned, premium red wine producer. With one basket press and all fruit being pressed through it ensures a softer and more traditional character to each wine.

Estate grown grapes only are used in the production of all St Mary's wines. Small batches of hand picked grapes are fermented in open vats,hand plunged and intensively monitored. The ferments are then Basket Pressed and barrel matured in climate controlled storage before being bottled on premises.

Barossa Valley

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Historically and presently the most important wine-producing region of Australia, the Barossa Valley is set in South Australia, where more than half of the country’s wine is made. Because the climate is very hot and dry, vineyard managers must be careful so that grapes do not become overripe.

The intense heat is ideal for plush, bold reds, particularly Rhône blends featuring Shiraz, Grenache, and Mataro (Mourvèdre). White grapes can produce crisp, fresh wines from Riesling, Chardonnay, and Semillon if they are planted at higher altitudes.

Most of Australia’s largest wine producers are based here and Shiraz plantings date back as far as 1860. Many of them are dry-farmed and bush-trained, still offering less than one ton per acre of inky, purple juice.

Friendly, approachable and full of juicy red fruit, Barbera produces wines in a wide range of styles, from youthful, fresh and fruity to serious, structured and age-worthy. Piedmont is the most famous source of Barbera, but it is also planted in a few nearby Italian provinces and remains one of the most widely planted varieties in the country. Barbera actually can adapt to many climates and enjoys success in California—particularly in the Sierra Foothills—and some southern hemisphere wine regions.

In the Glass

Barbera is typically marked by flavors of red cherry, raspberry or blackberry and backed by a signature zingy acidity. Warmer sites produce Barberas with intensely ripe fruit and complex notes of cocoa, savory spice, anise and nutmeg. Cooler sites will produce a lighter Barbera with more finesse and intriguing notes of cranberry, graphite, smoke, lavender and violet.

Perfect Pairings

Barbera’s prominent acidity makes it a natural match with tomato-based dishes, making it an easy pairing with a wide array of Italian cuisine. It works just as well with lighter red meat dishes, hamburgers or barbecue.

Sommelier Secret

In the past it wasn’t common or even accepted to age Barbera in oak but today both styles—oaked and unoaked—abound, at least in Piedmont. In fact, many Piemontese producers today still make a deliciously pure, fruity and unoaked version, intended for earlier consumption. The wine world didn't realize Barbera's potential until the work of Giacomo Bologna in Asti in the 1960s. His debut of the barrique-aged Barbera called Bricco dell’Uccellone revealed this grape's true potential. Many of the better bottlings of Piemontese Barbera can age gracefully for 10-15 years or more.

SSZS1STMBW04_2004 Item# 113991