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Sine Qua Non Rien Ne Va Plus Roussanne 2001

Roussanne from California
  • RP98
0% ABV
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Winemaker Notes

Critical Acclaim

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RP 98
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
One of the most amazing dry whites I have ever tasted is the 2001 Rien Ne Va Plus. Fashioned from 100% Roussanne, and aged on its lees for an extremely long period, my initial image when I tasted it was of the great Barsac, the 2001 Climens. However, the Sine Qua Non wine is bone dry with no sweetness evident. It gains in both stature and aromatic dimension as it sits in the glass. At first, I did not like it as well as the Whisperin’ E or the 2003 Proprietary White, but after 30-45 minutes in a decanter, the Rien Ne Va Plus was a symphony of exotic aromas and flavors. Dense, rich, and full-bodied, with impeccable balance, superb honeyed richness, and wonderfully integrated wood, it is undeniably the greatest New World expression of Roussanne made to date. Another dramatic characteristic, its golden color seemed to lighten as it sat in the glass and sucked up oxygen. This is an amazing achievement! Sadly, production is less than 100 cases.
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Sine Qua Non

Sine Qua Non

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Sine Qua Non, California
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Sine Qua Non was created after the 1994 harvest of a Bien Nacido Syrah named “The Queen of Spades”. Winemaker Manfred Krankl feels strongly that each vintage is a completely unique wine and thus he gives each wine a unique name. He also creates the artwork for each new label himself. Previously, Manfred had made wines with Bryan Babcock and John Alban and still sources much of his fruit from Alban’s vineyard. The basic white wines have always been a white blend of Chardonnay, Roussanne and Viognier and a red wine based on Syrah plus Grenache. Sometimes there are small quantities of Rose and a Grenache-based red.

Sine Qua Non has its own winemaking facility in Ventura, California not far from the Santa Barbara vineyards where the fruit is sourced from. In the last few years Manfred and his wife, Elaine, have begun creating their own vineyards dedicated to Rhone varietals. Their winemaking philosophy is to work in very small batches, gravity flow, natural yeasts (unless a fermentation problem is anticipated), long lees aging for the whites and repeated racking for the reds to open them up. This is a modified explanation of a very dedicated and artistic approach to winemaking. The wines are simultaneously very rich and elegant, superbly balanced and thoroughly harmonious with food, never overwhelming.

California

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Responsible for the vast majority of American wine production, if California were a country, it would be the world’s fourth largest wine-producing nation. The state’s diverse terrain and microclimates allow for an incredible range of wine styles, and unlike tradition-bound Europe, experimentation is more than welcome here. Wineries range from tiny, family-owned boutiques to massive corporations, and price and production are equally varied. Plenty of inexpensive bulk wine is made in the Central Valley area, while Napa Valley is responsible for some of the world’s most prestigious and expensive “cult” wines.

Each American Viticultural Area (AVA) and sub-AVA of has its own distinct personality, allowing California to produce wine of every fashion: from bone dry to unctuously sweet, still to sparkling, light and fresh to rich and full-bodied. In the Napa Valley, Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc dominate vineyard acreage. Sonoma County is best known for Chardonnay, Pinot Noir, Cabernet Sauvignon and Zinfandel. The Central Coast has carved out a niche with Rhône Blends blends based on Grenache and Syrah, while Mendocino has found success with cool climate varieties such as Pinot noir, Riesling and Gewürztraminer. With all the diversity that California has to offer, any wine lover will find something to get excited about here.

Roussanne

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Full and silky in body but also charmingly crisp, Roussanne makes a stellar blending grape. Thought to be native to the Rhone River Valley of France, and still predominantly grown there, it is responsible for some of the finest Northern Rhône white wines. Roussanne adds richness and acidity to Marsanne’s soft, fruitiness, making the age worthy and highly respected whites from the appellations of Hermitage, Crozes-Hermitage, and St. Joseph. It has earned approval as one of the white varieties for Châteauneuf-du-Pape

In the Glass

Persistent aromas of exotic herbal tea, a full body nearly as complex as a red wine, and distinct apricot and honey flavors make Roussanne unique. With age, the wines gain a more oily and glycerin texture.

Perfect Pairings

Richer fish dishes such as salmon, lobster, crab or grilled shrimp work well with Roussanne and its blends. A meal of roast chicken with herbs and winter vegetables is also delicious. Stuffed Butternut Squash, vegetarian curry and baked brie with apricots are other ideas to pair with Roussanne based wines.

Sommelier Secret

Roussanne takes its name from the French word “roux,” meaning rouge or red because of the grapes’ pink glow. In California, virtually all of the 339 acres of Roussanne come from true clones brought over by Tablas Creek and John Alban.

KBRSQNRNVP_2001 Item# 116918