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Flat front label of wine
Flat front label of wine

Shardana 2007

Other Red Blends from Sardinia, Italy
  • RP91
14% ABV
  • WW91
  • RP93
  • JS92
  • WE92
  • RP94
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  • RP88
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14% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The color is a deep, deep purple with ruby reflections indicating concentration, intensity and complexity. Its black cherry notes are ripely confirmed on the nose, where fruit, leather and game are laced with subtle spice. On the palate, lingering aromas of overripe cherries, well integrated oak and spices, soft, smooth texture and layered structure, with a very long finish.

Critical Acclaim

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RP 91
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2007 Shardana comes across as quite rustic in this vintage. It is a big, powerful wine loaded with dark fruit, earthiness, licorice, tar, smoke and hints of brett. Plenty of rough edges remain, distancing the 2007 from the finer vintages that have been made here. Shardana is 85% Carignano and 15% Syrah aged in French oak. Anticipated maturity: 2012-2017.
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Shardana

Shardana

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Shardana, Sardinia, Italy
On Sardinia’s extreme southwest coastline, we find Sulcis: a cape of gently rolling land, jutting out into the Mediterranean in one ample sweep of white sand, steep vineyards and emerald waves. As you sail into the island from the south, Sulcis is your first view of Sardinia. It was this blue-green shore the Phoenicians first glimpsed from their Middle Eastern vessels, three thousand years ago. From the Sulcis peninsula, these adventurous traders navigated northwards, eventually colonizing the entire island. SHARDANA was their name for the native Sardinians — and the mysterious red symbol on the label shown above is a Phoenician S. Three thousand years later, Neil and Maria Empson chose this ancient word for their own tribute to beautiful Sardinia: a full-bodied, voluptuous red.

Sardinia

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Hailed for centuries as a Mediterranean vine-growing paradise, multiple cultures over many centuries have ruled the large island of Sardinia. Set in the middle of the Tyrrhenian Sea, the Phonoecians, Ancient Rome, and subsequently the Byzantines, Arabs and Catalans have all staked a claim on the island at some point in history. Along the way, these inhabitants transported many of their homeland’s prized vines and today Sardinia’s modern-day indigenous grape varieties claim multiple origins. Sardinia’s most important red grapes—namely Cannonau (a synonym for Grenache) and Carignan—are actually of Spanish origin.

Vermentino, a prolific Mediterranean variety, is the island’s star white. Vermentino has a stronghold the Languedoc region of France as well as Italy’s western and coastal regions, namely Liguria (where it is called Pigato), Piedmont (where it is called Favorita) and in Tuscany, where it goes by the name, Vermentino. The best Vermentino, in arguably all of the Mediterranean, grows in Sardinia's northeastern region of Gallura where its vines struggle to dig roots deep down into north-facing slopes of granitic soils. These Vermentino vines produce highly aromatic, full and concentrated whites of unparalleled balance.

Today aside from its dedication to viticulture, Sardinia remains committed to maintaining its natural farmlands, bucolic plains of grazing sheep and perhaps most of all, its sandy, sunny, Mediterranean beaches.

Other Red Blends

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With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

WWH123472_2007 Item# 115534