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Santa Anastasia Nero d'Avola 2000

Nero d'Avola from Italy
  • WS87
0% ABV
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0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Dense ruby color with a Zinfandel-like nose of berry fruit, pepper and spice. Sweet, rich , pure and delicious.

Critical Acclaim

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WS 87
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Santa Anastasia

Santa Anastasia

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Santa Anastasia, Italy
Image of winery
Along Sicily’s northern coastline, between the sea and the Apennine range of Madonie, the medieval abbey or "abbazia" of Santa Anastasia is steeped in a natural landscape so extraordinary that the present owner, entrepreneur Francesco Lena, decided to transform these 988 acres of farmland, olive groves, vineyards and medieval buildings into a model, ultramodern winery and an exclusive relais, where visitors would be able to enjoy the unique, sultry beauty of Sicily at its finest.

In the quarter of a century that has elapsed since Lena purchased the vast property (1980), an extraordinary team of agronomists and wine technicians, orchestrated by Lena himself with winemaker Riccardo Cotarella, has succeeded in crafting some of the new icons of Sicilian oenology from elevated, Guyot-trained vines and superb terroir.

Named “Oenotria” by the ancient Greeks for its abundance of grapevines, Italy has always had a culture that is virtually inextricable from wine. Wine grapes are grown just about everywhere throughout the country—a long and narrow boot-shaped peninsula extending into the Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas. The defining geographical feature of the country is the Apennine Mountain range, extending from Liguria in the north to Calabria in the south. The island of Sicily nearly grazes the toe of Italy’s boot, while Sardinia lies to the country’s west. Climate varies significantly throughout the country, with temperature being somewhat more dependent on elevation than latitude, though it is safe to generalize that the south is warmer. Much of the highest quality viticulture takes place on gently rolling, picturesque hillsides.

Italy boasts more indigenous varieties than any other country—between 500 and 800, depending on whom you ask—and most wine production relies upon these native grapes. In some regions, international varieties have worked their way in, but their use is declining in popularity, especially as younger growers begun to take interest in rediscovering forgotten local specialties. Sangiovese is the most widely planted variety in the country, reaching its greatest potential in parts of Tuscany. Nebbiolo is the prized grape of Piedmont in the northwest, producing singular, complex and age-worthy wines. Other important varieties include Montepulciano, Trebbiano, Barbera, Nero d’Avola and of course, Pinot Grigio.

Nero d'Avola

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Opulent with bold fruit and robust tannins, Nero d’Avola is Sicily’s most widely planted red grape, though the variety's other name, Calabrese, suggests origins from the mainland region of Calabria. Popular throughout Sicily and prized for its body, color and deep cherry fruit, Nero d’Avola performs well both as a single varietal bottling and in blends. It loves hot, arid climates and Sicily's old vines are aptly head-trained close to the ground, making them resistant to strong winds. A few pioneering producers in California as well as Australia farm Nero d’Avola in the same way.

In the Glass

A couple of styles of Nero d’Avola are possible. The first is typically a powerful, opulent, dark fruit driven style with notes of coffee or cocoa from aging in wood. A second style offers up a snappier version with red cherry fruit and herbal notes, having seen little to no oak during aging.

Perfect Pairings

Nero d’Avola’s black fruit and spicy flavors are perfect with rich flavors like grilled meat or stews, but can also be a great compliment to burgers, pizza or pasta.

Sommelier Secret

If you love big, bold wines like Napa Cabernet and Châteauneuf-du-Pape but want to stick to a budget, look no further than Nero d’Avola for a worthy substitute. Even the best examples often run under $20.

WWH362NASA2_2000 Item# 55346