Ruinart Brut Rose (375ML half-bottle) Front Label
Ruinart Brut Rose (375ML half-bottle) Front LabelRuinart Brut Rose (375ML half-bottle) Front Bottle Shot

Ruinart Brut Rose (375ML half-bottle)

  • WS94
  • D92
  • JS92
  • W&S92
  • RP91
375ML / 12.5% ABV
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4.5 61 Ratings
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4.5 61 Ratings
375ML / 12.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

On the palate the attack is distinctive and full, cradled by a gentle effervescence. The balance brings together delightful freshness and a voluptuous body. An elegant burst of peppermint and pink grapefruit rounds out this cheeky palette of aromas.

The nose offers intense notes of exotic fruits (pomegranate, lychee and guava) that develop alongside soft floral essences (rose) and notes of freshly picked red fruits (cherry, raspberry and wild strawberry). These aromas splendidly showcase the wine’s subtle, spicy notes (tonka bean and nutmeg).

Food Pairing
Ruinart Rosé is a delight to drink throughout a meal from aperitif to dessert.

It makes an excellent complement to fine Italian prosciutto (thinly sliced San Daniele or Parma). A starter of salmon, served mi-cuit or as Japanese style tataki, will bring out the many facets of this champagne.

It also pairs well with an exotic main course. An Andalusian gazpacho will awaken its freshness and vivacity; fillet of duck breast cooked rare and served with cranberries will accentuate its harmonious complexity.

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
WS 94
Wine Spectator

A classy rosé that glides across the palate, with flavors of raspberry coulis, yellow peach, chamomile and blanched almond that expand on the creamy mousse and linger on the lightly spiced finish, powered by mouthwatering acidity. Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

D 92
Decanter
A blend of 55% Pinot Noir and 45% Chardonnay, and featuring around 25% reserve wines, this is 100% premier cru fruit from the Montagne des Reims and Côte des Blancs. Almost a third of the Pinot Noir was vinified as a still wine. A deep coral colour, this is fresh and youthful, with rounded wild red berry fruit, and hint of rose. With some time in the glass, it develops deeper, complex, more exotic notes, leading to a long and lively finish. Dosage: 8g/L.
JS 92
James Suckling
Rather dark-colored with cherry, watermelon and stone undertones. Full-bodied and layered, with iron and strawberry at the end. Drink now.
W&S 92
Wine & Spirits

This blends chardonnay (45 percent) and pinot noir (55 percent, of which 19 percent was vinified as red wine). They come together in a lasting essence of roses and wild strawberries, the wine’s fruit complexity amplified by the sensation of acidity, with its fine limestone abrasion. A clean, simple beauty from Champagne.

RP 91
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate

The latest rendition of Ruinart's NV Brut Rosé is a pretty, vibrant wine that offers up inviting aromas of tangerine, blood orange, plum and freshly baked bread. Medium to full-bodied, fleshy and precise, with tangy acids and a pretty mousse, it's ca harming, comparatively vinous wine that is already showing well.

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Ruinart

Ruinart

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Ruinart, France
Ruinart Winery Video
Founded in 1729, Ruinart is the first established champagne house in the world, born from the ambition of Dom Ruinart’s true enlightened mind. His vision made him perceive before anyone else the potential of sparkling wines from the Champagne region. Each of Ruinart’s cuvées bears the distinctive signature of Chardonnay, the House’s emblematic grape variety. Elegance, refinement, purity, light and distinctive taste make Ruinart a timeless and modern icon.

Ruinart Blanc de Blancs is the emblem of the House, and it is the perfect expression of the Ruinart taste. It is comprised of 100% Chardonnay grapes grown primarily with Premiers Crus from the Côte de Blancs and Montagne de Reims terroirs, both prized for their aromatic finesse.

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Associated with luxury, celebration, and romance, the region, Champagne, is home to the world’s most prized sparkling wine. In order to bear the label, ‘Champagne’, a sparkling wine must originate from this northeastern region of France—called Champagne—and adhere to strict quality standards. Made up of the three towns Reims, Épernay, and Aÿ, it was here that the traditional method of sparkling wine production was both invented and perfected, birthing a winemaking technique as well as a flavor profile that is now emulated worldwide.

Well-drained, limestone and chalky soil defines much of the region, which lend a mineral component to its wines. Champagne’s cold, continental climate promotes ample acidity in its grapes but weather differences from year to year can create significant variation between vintages. While vintage Champagnes are produced in exceptional years, non-vintage cuvées are produced annually from a blend of several years in order to produce Champagnes that maintain a consistent house style.

With nearly negligible exceptions, . These can be blended together or bottled as individual varietal Champagnes, depending on the final style of wine desired. Chardonnay, the only white variety, contributes freshness, elegance, lively acidity and notes of citrus, orchard fruit and white flowers. Pinot Noir and its relative Pinot Meunier, provide the backbone to many blends, adding structure, body and supple red fruit flavors. Wines with a large proportion of Pinot Meunier will be ready to drink earlier, while Pinot Noir contributes to longevity. Whether it is white or rosé, most Champagne is made from a blend of red and white grapes—and uniquely, rosé is often produce by blending together red and white wine. A Champagne made exclusively from Chardonnay will be labeled as ‘blanc de blancs,’ while ones comprised of only red grapes are called ‘blanc de noirs.’

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What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

How is sparkling rosé wine made?

There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

SOU401845_0 Item# 103428

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