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Roserock by Drouhin Oregon Eola-Amity Hills Pinot Noir 2015

Pinot Noir from Eola-Amity Hills, Willamette Valley, Oregon
  • JS94
  • TP93
  • RP92
  • V91
  • WS90
14.1% ABV
  • JS94
  • RP91
  • WW91
  • W&S90
  • WS90
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4.4 16 Ratings
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4.4 16 Ratings
14.1% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The Roserock Pinot Noir has a lovely, deep red color. The nose is floral, spicy and beautiful, with an intense, savory character. On the palate, there are notes of dark berry preserves, a touch of caramel, black cherry, dried flowers, and tilled earth. There is clear structure and balance, with good mouth weight and a long finish. This wine can be enjoyed for the next 7-10 years, or more, but it also offers a lot now.

Critical Acclaim

All Vintages
JS 94
James Suckling
Another amazing pinot noir that shows such purity of the fruit. Blueberries, raspberries, lemons, oranges and hints of caramel. Medium to full body, an incredibly polished texture and a beautiful, exciting finish.
TP 93
Tasting Panel

Dotted with salinity and strawberry on the nose. Some earthy notes and pencil shavings alongside dusty rose petals, raspberry, and mulberry. Silky, clean, bright, and long. 

RP 92
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Pale ruby-purple colored, the 2015 Roserock Pinot Noir is a little closed at this youthful stage, offering delicate red cherry and raspberry leaf notes over hints of black pepper and lavender. Medium-bodied, the palate offers firm, chewy tannins and a lively backbone to support the red berry and cedar-laced flavors, finishing long with a nice toastiness.
Rating: 92+
V 91
Vinous
Vivid red. An exotically perfumed bouquet displays ripe black raspberry, cherry and allspice, and a strong floral quality comes up with aeration. Juicy, sweet and expansive in the mouth, offering lively red fruit and rose pastille flavors and supple texture. Shows appealing sweetness and finishes with resonating florality, strong cling and neatly woven tannins.
WS 90
Wine Spectator
Harmonious and well-built, with expressive pomegranate and cherry flavors accented by bay leaf and spice notes. Drink now through 2024.
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Roserock by Drouhin Oregon

Roserock by Drouhin Oregon

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Roserock by Drouhin Oregon, Eola-Amity Hills, Willamette Valley, Oregon
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Drouhin Oregon Roserock is the newest chapter in the Drouhin story, extending from Burgundy's Cote d’Or and Chablis, to the Dundee Hills of Oregon, and now Oregon's Eola-Amity Hills.

Drouhin Oregon Roserock continues a four-generation story that began in 1880 when Joseph Drouhin moved from Chablis to Beaune, in the heart of Burgundy.

In Oregon, as in Burgundy, the Drouhin Family farms singular, expressive parcels of land. The Roserock Vineyard sits at the southern tip of the Eola-Amity Hills, in Oregon's Willamette Valley and is marked by volcanic soils, cooler temperatures and an ideal elevation range. Farmed by Phillipe Drouhin, Roserock is certified sustainable.

Eola-Amity Hills

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Running north to south, adjacent to the Willamette River, the Eola-Amity Hills AVA has shallow and well-drained soils created from ancient lava flows (called Jory), marine sediments, rocks and alluvial deposits. These soils force vine roots to dig deep, producing small grapes with great concentration. Like in the McMinnville sub-AVA, cold Pacific air streams in via the VanDuzer corridor and assists the maintenance of higher acidities in its grapes. This great concentration, combined with marked acidity, give the Eola-Amity Hills wines—namely Pinot noir—their distinct character. While the region covers 40,000 acres, no more than 1,400 acres are covered in vine.

Pinot Noir

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One of the most finicky yet rewarding grapes to grow, Pinot Noir is a labor of love for many. However, the greatest red wines of Burgundy prove that it is unquestionably worth the effort. In fact, it is the only red variety permitted in Burgundy. Highly reflective of its terroir, Pinot Noir prefers calcareous soils and a cool climate, requires low yields to achieve high quality and demands a lot of attention in the vineyard and winery. It retains even more glory as an important component of Champagne as well as on its own in France’s Loire Valley and Alsace regions. This sensational grape enjoys immense international success, most notably growing in Oregon, California and New Zealand with smaller amounts in Chile, Germany (as Spätburgunder) and Italy (as Pinot Nero).

In the Glass

Pinot Noir is all about red fruit—strawberry, raspberry and cherry with some heftier styles delving into the red or purple plum and in the other direction, red or orange citrus. It is relatively pale in color with soft tannins and a lively acidity. With age (of which the best examples can handle an astounding amount) it can develop hauntingly alluring characteristics of fresh earth, savory spice, dried fruit and truffles.

Perfect Pairings

Pinot’s healthy acidity cuts through the oiliness of pink-fleshed fish like salmon and tuna but its mild mannered tannins give it enough structure to pair with all sorts of poultry: chicken, quail and especially duck. As the namesake wine of Boeuf Bourguignon, Pinot noir has proven it isn’t afraid of beef. California examples work splendidly well with barbecue and Pinot Noir is also vegetarian-friendly—most notably with any dish that features mushrooms.

Sommelier Secret

For administrative purposes, the region of Beaujolais is often included in Burgundy. But it is extremely different in terms of topography, soil and climate, and the important red grape here is ultimately Gamay. Truth be told, there is a tiny amount of Gamay sprinkled around the outlying parts of Burgundy (mainly in Maconnais) but it isn’t allowed with any great significance and certainly not in any Villages or Cru level wines.

WWH148951_2015 Item# 360856