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Rolf Binder Eden Valley Highness Riesling 2012

Riesling from Barossa Valley, Barossa, Australia
  • RP90
0% ABV
  • WS90
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0% ABV

Winemaker Notes

A crisp elegant full-flavored style sourced from Eden Valley fruit. A fine tasting elegant wine exhibiting a fresh and slightly musty aroma with hints of fresh limes. The sensation of abundant citrus characters offers a youthful and fresh palate with good depth of fruit and drying acidity.

Critical Acclaim

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RP 90
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2012 Riesling Highness shows off fragrant notes of apple blossom, pink grapefruit and lemon zest with hints of lime leaves and coriander seed. Light to medium-bodied, it is dry with plenty of ripe, expressive Riesling flavor that displays slight tropical fruit exuberance and a crisp acid line. It finishes long. Drink it now to 2020+.
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Rolf Binder

Rolf Binder

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Rolf Binder, Barossa Valley, Barossa, Australia
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Rolf Binder and sister Christa Deans, produce a range of highly acclaimed Barossa premium wines using fruit from their own estate and other Barossa vineyards. Rolf focuses on red winemaking, for which he has received international accolades, and Christa is recognized as one of the region’s finest white winemakers. American wine critic, Robert Parker Junior describes Rolf Binder as “one of my favorite wineries (whose) offerings are never excessively oaked, possess extraordinary ripe, concentrated fruit, great individuality.”

Rolf Heinrich Binder and his wife, Franziska, arrived in Australia (from Austria and Hungary respectively) in 1950 as part of the large influx of post war immigration. As payment for the government assistance, they worked for the South Australian Railway for three years. During that time they met Elmore Schulz, a train driver and grape grower in the Barossa Valley, and namesake to Barossa Valley Estate’s E&E Shiraz. While picking grapes for Schulz in 1953, the couple met Langmeil Road winemakers, Chris Vohrer and Wilhelm Abel, a meeting that proved to set their future in the wine business. In 1954 they worked a vintage in this winery and subsequently purchased the business in 1955, renaming it ‘Veritas’, taken from the Latin quote “In Vino Veritas” – in wine, truth. The winery name was changed from Veritas to Rolf Binder in 2005 to honor Rolf Heinrich Binder who passed away in 2003. Since then, the business has grown substantially throughout Australia, with wines also now exported to 19 countries.

Barossa Valley

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Historically and presently the most important wine-producing region of Australia, the Barossa Valley is set in South Australia, where more than half of the country’s wine is made. Because the climate is very hot and dry, vineyard managers must be careful so that grapes do not become overripe.

The intense heat is ideal for plush, bold reds, particularly Rhône blends featuring Shiraz, Grenache, and Mataro (Mourvèdre). White grapes can produce crisp, fresh wines from Riesling, Chardonnay, and Semillon if they are planted at higher altitudes.

Most of Australia’s largest wine producers are based here and Shiraz plantings date back as far as 1860. Many of them are dry farmed and bush trained, still offering less than one ton per acre of inky, purple juice.

Riesling

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A regal variety of incredible purity and precision, Riesling possesses a remarkable ability to reflect the character of wherever it is grown while still maintaining easily identifiable typicity. This versatile grape can be just as enjoyable dry or sweet, young or old, still or sparkling and can age longer than nearly any other white variety. Riesling is best known in Germany and Alsace, and is also of great importance in Austria. The variety has also been particularly successful in Australia’s Clare and Eden Valleys, New Zealand, Washington, cooler regions of California, and the Finger Lakes region of New York.

In the Glass

Riesling typically produces wine with relatively low alcohol, high acidity, steely minerality and stone fruit, spice, citrus and floral notes. At its ripest, it leans towards juicy peach, nectarine and pineapple, while cooler climes produce Rieslings more redolent of meyer lemon, lime and green apple. With age, Riesling can become truly revelatory, developing unique, complex aromatics, often with a hint of petrol.

Perfect Pairings

Riesling is quite versatile, enjoying the company of sweet-fleshed fish like sole, most Asian food, especially Thai and Vietnamese (bottlings with some residual sugar and low alcohol are the perfect companions for dishes with substantial spice) and freshly shucked oysters. Sweeter styles work well with fruit-based desserts.

Sommelier Secret

It can be difficult to discern the level of sweetness in a Riesling, and German labeling laws do not make things any easier. Look for the world “trocken” to indicate a dry wine, or “halbtrocken” or “feinherb” for off-dry. Some producers will include a helpful sweetness scale on the back label—happily, a growing trend.

ALL4352844_2012 Item# 128752