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Quinta Nova Pomares Moscatel 2011

Muscat from Portugal
  • RP89
750ML / 12% ABV
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750ML / 12% ABV

Winemaker Notes

With a citrine color, this attractive and young wine presents a strong muscat aroma, with hints of citrines, tropical fruits and fresh herbs. It is creamy on the palate with a well integrated acidity, strong flavor and very long finish.

Critical Acclaim

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RP 89
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
The 2011 Branco Pomares Orange Label is all Moscatel Galego (meaning the familiar Muscat a Petits Grains). Since I’d never seen this bottling previously, it’s worth revisiting it with an extra six months or so of time in the bottle to settle down. It probably didn’t need a lot of time, if any, but it is certainly showing its classiness now. It is, perhaps, a touch more open and juicier. Mostly, though, it retains perfectly its original, elegant, well-balanced demeanor, still fresh, crisp and aromatic. It is solid enough to hold up to food, but easy to drink. It held well for about three days in the fridge, although it became more herbaceous towards the end. It remained completely delicious and charming. It should continue to hold for a couple of years at or near peak, but as noted previously, there is no particular need to hold it..It lingers beautifully on the finish.
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Quinta Nova

Quinta Nova

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Quinta Nova, Portugal
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This sizeable Quinta is beautifully situated, a short way upstream of Quinta do Crasto in the Cima Corgo region of the Douro. It’s owned by Amorim (the well known cork company), who acquired it when they bought Port house Burmester (which they have since sold on). The first table wines from the estate vineyards were released in 2005.

The Quinta gets its name from the patron saint of the 17th century riverside chapel on the property, where the crews of the Rabelo boats would pray for protection on this, which before the Douro was dammed would have been quite a dangerous stretch of the river. The chapel contains within it a statue of Nosso Senhora, which apparently is so heavy (despite its small size) that it takes a few strong men to lift it.

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Best known for intense, impressive and age-worthy fortified wines, Portugal relies almost exclusively on its many indigenous grape varieties. Bordering Spain to its north and east, and the Atlantic Ocean on its west and south coasts, this is a land where tradition reigns supreme, due to its relative geographical and, for much of the 20th century, political isolation. A long and narrow but small country, Portugal claims considerable diversity in climate and wine styles, with milder weather in the north and significantly more rainfall near the coast.

While Port (named after its city of Oporto on the Atlantic Coast at the end of the Douro Valley), made Portugal famous, Portugal is also an excellent source of dry red and white wines of various styles.

The Duoro Valley produces full-bodied and concentrated dry red wines made from the same set of grape varieties used for Port, which include Touriga Nacional, Tinta Roriz (Spain’s Tempranillo), Touriga Franca, Tinta Barroca and Tinto Cão, among a long list of others in minor proportions.

Other dry wines include the tart, slightly effervescent Vinho Verde white wine, made in the north, and the bright, elegant reds and whites of the Dão as well as the bold, and fruit-driven reds and whites of the southern, Alentejo.

The nation’s other important fortified wine, Madeira, is produced on the eponymous island off the North African coast.

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Muscat / Moscato

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Alluringly aromatic and delightful, Muscat never takes itself too seriously. Muscat is actually an umbrella name for a diverse set of grapes, some of which are genetically related and some of which, are not. The two most important versions are the noble, Muscat blanc à Petits Grains, making wines of considerable quality and Muscat of Alexandria, thought to be a progeny of the former. Both are grown throughout the world and can be made in a wide range of styles from dry to sweet, still to sparkling and even fortified. It is well known in Italy's Piedmont region for Moscato d’Asti, a slightly sparkling, semi-sweet, refreshing wine that is low in alcohol. On the Iberian peninsula, it goes by Moscatel, not to be confused with Bordeaux's Muscadelle, which is acutally unrelated.

In the Glass

Muscat wines possess marked aromatics and flavors of peach, pear, Meyer lemon, orange, orange blossom, rose petal, jasmine, honeysuckle or lychee, often with a hint of sweet spice.

Perfect Pairings

Thanks to its naturally low alcohol levels, Muscat is a perfect match for spicy Asian cuisine, especially when the wine has a little bit of residual sugar. Off-dry Muscat can work well with lighter desserts like key lime pie and lemon meringue, while fully sweet Muscat-based dessert wines are enjoyable after dinner with an assortment of cheeses.

Sommelier Secret

Muscat is one of the oldest known grape varieties, dating as far back as the days of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Pliny the Elder wrote in the 13th century of a sweet, perfumed grape variety so attractive to bees that he referred to it as uva apiana, or “grape of the bees.” Most likely, he was describing one of the Muscat varieties.

HNYQNAMOS11C_2011 Item# 142569