Quinta de la Rosa Estate Red 2011 Front Label
Quinta de la Rosa Estate Red 2011 Front LabelQuinta de la Rosa Estate Red 2011 Front Bottle Shot

Quinta de la Rosa Estate Red 2011

  • WE91
  • WS90
  • W&S90
750ML / 14.5% ABV
Other Vintages
  • WE90
  • WE90
  • WE91
  • W&S90
  • WE91
  • WE91
  • WS90
  • WE93
  • WE92
  • W&S91
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4.0 13 Ratings
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4.0 13 Ratings
750ML / 14.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Intense violet color that shows the concentration of the wine, aromas still very young with enormous complexity that, whilst difficult to define, shows all of the Douro – mature darkred fruit, floral, citrus, herbal and schist elements are all presentOn the palate, dense and rich but at the same time not heavy. Long and complex with a good, balanced tannin structure which give tension and structure to the wine without destroying the elegance and equilibrium of this wine. Drink now or cellar for up to 5 or so years.

Pair with: any meat dish or cheese, spicy dishes as well as robust fish.

Critical Acclaim

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WE 91
Wine Enthusiast
This is a smooth and generous wine. It is rich, full-bodied and packed with dark plum flavor, but it's the ripe, velvet character that is so appealing. It's almost ready to drink, although the firm tannins and minerality at the end suggest it will be better from 2016.
WS 90
Wine Spectator
A big, strapping red, with well-rounded flavors of boysenberry and roasted plum, accented by concentrated spice and green olive notes. The finish lengthens out, with accents of dried beef and hoisin sauce. Drink now through 2018. 4,750 cases made.
W&S 90
Wine & Spirits
This wine’s generous blue fruit has high-toned notes of volatility, hinting at orange zest before retreating into schist tannins. Decant this and serve it with a grilled steak to bring out the fruit.Winesellers, Niles, IL
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Quinta de la Rosa

Quinta de la Rosa

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Quinta de la Rosa, Portugal
Quinta de la Rosa Winery Video

Quinta de la Rosa was one of the pioneers of making and selling table wines and olive oil in addition to port directly from the estate. These products are produced, matured and bottled on the Quinta and not in Vila Nova da Gaia as is the case with other shippers. It can be argued that this helps give our ports a dry and stylish nutty flavour. A combination of the best of the old with the new, treading in granite lagares and using stainless steel and temperature controlled technology, together with careful handling of natural materials (such as oak casks for the table wine and large old tonels for the port), ensures that wines of the highest quality are made. As everything is grown, made and bottled on the estate, Quinta de la Rosa is one of the few true "Single Quintas"; it is not a second brand used by most large shippers for their "off Vintage" port years.

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Best known for intense, impressive and age-worthy fortified wines, Portugal relies almost exclusively on its many indigenous grape varieties. Bordering Spain to its north and east, and the Atlantic Ocean on its west and south coasts, this is a land where tradition reigns supreme, due to its relative geographical and, for much of the 20th century, political isolation. A long and narrow but small country, Portugal claims considerable diversity in climate and wine styles, with milder weather in the north and significantly more rainfall near the coast.

While Port (named after its city of Oporto on the Atlantic Coast at the end of the Douro Valley), made Portugal famous, Portugal is also an excellent source of dry red and white wines of various styles.

The Douro Valley produces full-bodied and concentrated dry red wines made from the same set of grape varieties used for Port, which include Touriga Nacional, Tinta Roriz (Spain’s Tempranillo), Touriga Franca, Tinta Barroca and Tinto Cão, among a long list of others in minor proportions.

Other dry wines include the tart, slightly effervescent Vinho Verde white wine, made in the north, and the bright, elegant reds and whites of the Dão as well as the bold, and fruit-driven reds and whites of the southern, Alentejo.

The nation’s other important fortified wine, Madeira, is produced on the eponymous island off the North African coast.

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With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended red wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged resulting in a wide variety of red wine styles. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a red wine blend variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

How to Serve Red Wine

A common piece of advice is to serve red wine at “room temperature,” but this suggestion is imprecise. After all, room temperature in January is likely to be quite different than in August, even considering the possible effect of central heating and air conditioning systems. The proper temperature to aim for is 55° F to 60° F for lighter-bodied reds and 60° F to 65° F for fuller-bodied wines. How much does this matter?

How Long Does Red Wine Last?

Once opened and re-corked, a bottle stored in a cool, dark environment (like your fridge) will stay fresh and nicely drinkable for a day or two. There are products available that can extend that period by a couple of days. As for unopened bottles, optimal storage means keeping them on their sides in a moderately humid environment at about 57° F. Red wines stored in this manner will stay good – and possibly improve – for anywhere from one year to multiple decades. Assessing how long to hold on to a bottle is a complicated science. If you are planning long-term storage of your reds, seek the advice of a wine professional.

MNS30129380_2011 Item# 156350

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