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Pico Maccario Lavignone Rosato 2016

Rosé from Piedmont, Italy
    12.5% ABV
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    12.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Pale salmon in appearance, Lavignone Rosato is beautiful to look at. It is even better to drink, however, as the nose and palate are met by playful aromas of wild strawberry, watermelon, cranberry, fresh-cut grass, and river stone. A refreshing, but modest, backbone of acidity supports a round mouth-feel and velvety texture. The dry and balanced finish leaves the palate feeling clean and refreshed.

    A good rose is not just pleasurable, it is versatile too. Lavignone Rosato's bright aromatics and dry finish make it ideally suited to a wide range of dishes that incorporate fresh, in-season ingredients-- particularly fresh vegetables and tomatoes. From a cool salad of farfalle pasta, fava beans, cherry tomatoes and spring onion to salt-baked red snapper with coconut rice to an evening on the back patio, Lavignone Rosato is right at home.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Pico Maccario

    Pico Maccario

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    Pico Maccario, Piedmont, Italy
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    Pico Maccario, a dedicated Barbera specialist, is found on the hills of Mombaruzzo in the Asti DOCG at an average altitude of 180 meters. Comprising one single, contiguous parcel, their vineyard covers 70 hectares and is the largest solely-owned vineyard in Piedmont. Within the 70 hectares, there are some 315,000 vines capped at the end of each row by one of the approximately 4,500 red rose bushes on the property. It is no surprise that the rose is part of the winery's emblem. Out of the 70 hectares, 55 are planted to Barbera.

    The estate boasts state-of-the-art equipment, including stainless-steel tanks that have computerized controls for monitoring temperature and all stages of fermentation. The soils of Mombaruzzo are primarily clay, which impart full body and a silky texture to the wines. Both wines are aged exclusively in stainless-steel tanks to preserve the freshest fruit flavors. The name of the entry-level Barbera, Berro, means "I will drink," and refers to the wine's easy-drinking, crowd-pleasing purity. Lavignone is named after one of the 18th-century farmhouses located on the property. Its velvety mouthfeel and bright cherry and blueberry flavors come at a remarkably advantageous price point, one rarely seen for Barbera of this quality in this day and age, offering great value.

    Piedmont

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    A prestigious and distinctive region for red wines in northwestern Italy, Piedmont is responsible for some of the country’s longest-lived and most sought-after wines. Set with a backdrop of the visually stunning Alps, its most prized vines are planted at higher altitudes on the warmer, south-facing slopes where sunlight exposure is maximized. The climate is continental, with cold winters and hot, humid summers. Despite the rain shadow effect of the Alps, precipitation takes place year-round, and the reliable autumnal fog provides a cooling effect, which prolongs hang time and aids in the development of phenolic ripeness in its grapes.

    Easy-going Barbera is the most planted grape in Piedmont, beloved for its trademark high acidity, low tannin, and juicy red fruit. However, the most prized variety is Nebbiolo, named for the region’s omnipresent fog (“nebbia” in Italian). This grape is responsible for the exalted wines of Barbaresco and Barolo, known for their ageability, firm tannins and hallmark aromas of tar and roses. Nebbiolo wines, despite their pale hue, pack a pleasing punch of flavor and structure, and the best examples can require about a decade’s wait before they become approachable. Barbaresco tends to be more elegant in style while Barolo is more powerful. Across the Tanaro River, the Roero region, and the farther north, the regions of Gattinara and Ghemme, also provide excellent quality Nebbiolo.

    Dolcetto is Piedmont’s other important red grape, ready to drink within a couple of years of release. White wines are less important here but range from fruity and fresh to serious and able to take a few years in the cellar. Key varieties include Arneis, Cortese, Timorasso, Erbaluce and the sweet, charming Muscat, responsible for the brilliantly recognizable, Moscato d'Asti.

    Rosé Wine

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    Whether it’s playful and fun or savory and serious, most rosé today is not your grandmother’s White Zinfandel, though that category remains strong. Pink wine has recently become quite trendy, and this time around it’s commonly quite dry. It is produced throughout the world from a vast array of grape varieties, but the most successful sources are California, southern France (particularly Provence), and parts of Spain and Italy.

    Since the pigment in red wines comes from keeping fermenting juice in contact with the grape skins for an extended period, it follows that a pink wine can be made using just a brief period of skin contact—usually just a couple of days. The resulting color will depend on the grape variety and the winemaking style, ranging from pale salmon to deep magenta. These wines are typically fresh and fruity, fermented at cool temperatures in stainless steel to preserve the primary aromas and flavors. Most rosé, with a few notable exceptions, should be drunk rather young, within a few years of the vintage.

    WBO30191773_2016 Item# 180647