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Pecchenino San Luigi Dogliani Dolcetto 2013

Dolcetto from Dogliani, Piedmont, Italy
    13% ABV
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    13% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Ruby red with violet highlights. Fruit-forward with notes of currants, raspberries, blackberries and prunes. Well-balanced with sweet tannins and good acidity.

    Pairs well with appetizers, pastas, white meats, red meats and roasts.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Pecchenino

    Pecchenino

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    Pecchenino, Dogliani, Piedmont, Italy
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    The Company was founded at the end of the nineteenth century, in an area where Dolcetto vineyards have been a typical feature for centuries, as is documented by a writing that dates back to 1432, which is kept in the communal archives.

    The farm has always been family run, and the land has passed from father to son throughout its history. The first historical evidence of the farm is from the beginning of the twentieth century, when the farm was led by Attilio Pecchenino (the grandfather) and had little more than 8 hectares of land. In the 70s, the farm was given to Marino Pecchenino (Attilio's son), and in 1987 to Orlando and Attilio (Marino's two sons) who currently own it and manage it. At present, after having recently bought a new farm (Bricco Botti), the total land owned by Pecchenino is approx. 25 hectares, all in the area of Dogliani. For a couple of year now, Pecchenino has expended much energy on making his dolcettos more elegant and appetizing abroad as well as in Italy. The results clearly show in his two main house Dolcettos: the San Luigi and the Siri d'Jermu that recently was upgraded to Dogliani DOCG status.

    Pecchenino winery is managed in a sustainable fashion: Orlando is convinced that the quality of his wine is strictly related to the natural health of his vineyard. His main objective is that of growing the best possible grapes with the lowest possible impact on nature. In the vineyards, he opts for organic compost and avoids the use of any chemical products for weed or pest control; his treatments in the vineyards are all natural unless it becomes absolutely necessary.

    Dogliani

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    The hills of Dogliani, just to the south of the Barolo zone, produce the very best Dolcetto wines in the world. Its rolling hills reach higher elevations than those of Barolo and the area maintains strong Dolcetto vineyards as well as groves of hazelnut trees, farmland, pastures, and forests. Dogliani became its own DOCG in 2005; in order for a Dolcetto to be classified as Dogliani DOCG, it must come from one of the following communes: Bastia Mondovì, Belvedere Langhe, Clavesana, Cigliè, Dogliani, Farigliano, Monchiero, Rocca Cigliè, Roddino and Somano. Dogliani DOCG must have a deep red color, elegance, intense fruit, and aromas of currants, raspberry, and blackberry.

    Dolcetto

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    An easy-drinker with modest acidity, soft fruity flavors—but catchy tannins, Dolcetto is often enjoyed in its native Piedmont while more serious Barolos and Barbarescos take their time to age. Here, this is the wine you are most likely to find at the table on a casual Tuesday night, accompanying local charcuterie or "apertivo" hour (the canonical Piemontese way to tease your palate before dinner). In recent years Dolcetto has found some footing in California, but plantings are fairly limited outside of Italy.

    In the Glass

    Dolcetto translates to “little sweet one,” and though the wines produced are typically not sweet in terms of residual sugar, they do possess delightfully fruity flavors of red cherry and blueberry, with an almond-like bitterness at the end and occasional hints of chocolate and baking spice.

    Perfect Pairings

    Dolcetto is a lively, exuberant variety without a ton of complexity in most cases, and as such is best paired with simple, flavorsome foods such as pasta, pizza and simple meats—anything an Italian farmer might consume after a long day in the field.

    Sommelier Secret

    In most of Piedmont, easy-ripening Dolcetto is relegated to the secondary sites—the best of which are reserved for the king variety: Nebbiolo. However, in the Dogliani zone it is the star of the show, and here it makes a bigger, riper and a more serious style of Dolcetto, many of which can improve with cellar time.

    MNC13812F_2013 Item# 133140