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Patricia Green Freedom Hill Pinot Noir 2015

Pinot Noir from Eola-Amity Hills, Willamette Valley, Oregon
  • WE93
14.5% ABV
  • RP93
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4.7 6 Ratings
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4.7 6 Ratings
14.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

This Freedom Hill Pinot Noir has the deep pigmentation, floral aromatics, intense mid-palate sweetness and structured finishing tannins that provide the wine with enough fortitude to hold the fruit sweetness well in check. This balances at a very high level. For all the dry extract-laden fruit here there is a wealth of acidity and tannin that are actually the dominant forces in the wine and ensure that this is a focused, smart and incredibly delicious Pinot Noir. This has so much to it that it will drink well almost immediately but has an upside that is clearly well more than a decade away.

Critical Acclaim

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WE 93
Wine Enthusiast
The biggest production and lowest priced of all the winery's vineyard designates, this is sexy, substantial and one of the best offerings from any winery sourcing fruit from this exceptional vineyard. A riot of berries, plums and Asian spices fills the mouth—well-integrated, layered and detailed right on through the extended finish. A light dusting of cocoa powder lingers and invites the next sip.
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Patricia Green

Patricia Green

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Patricia Green, Eola-Amity Hills, Willamette Valley, Oregon
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Patricia Green Cellars is located in the Ribbon Ridge district of Yamhill County on the 52 acre estate purchased in 2000 by Patty Green and Jim Anderson. The winery, and thus the two friends, are noted for producing a tremendously broad selection of Pinot Noirs from far flung vineyards representing some of the better sites in the Ribbon Ridge, Dundee Hills, Chehalem Mountains, and the Eola Hills growing regions. We look to produce Pinot Noirs that show the distinctions of the sites we work with. All of the vineyards we either maintain or purchase fruit from are extremely well-tended sites that seek to grow the best fruit possible through rigorous attention to detail on every single vine. To ensure that our sites truly show the characteristics of the soil, micro-climate and clonal material none of them use irrigation.

In the winery the philosophy of attention to the smallest details is further extended all the way from the fermenting must to the final bottling process. All of our wines at all of their points of evolution are handled and manipulated as little as possible while being smelled and tasted on a regular basis. Our selection of barrels has been limited to one cooper noted for producing some of the best made Pinot Noir barrels in the world. As we produce as many as 15-16 different bottlings of Pinot Noir under our own label each vintage the decisions we make about the quality of every single barrel is quite rigorous ensuring that each bottling represents the best possible wine from each vineyard with which we work.

Eola-Amity Hills

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Running north to south, adjacent to the Willamette River, the Eola-Amity Hills AVA has shallow and well-drained soils created from ancient lava flows (called Jory), marine sediments, rocks and alluvial deposits. These soils force vine roots to dig deep, producing small grapes with great concentration. Like in the McMinnville sub-AVA, cold Pacific air streams in via the VanDuzer corridor and assists the maintenance of higher acidities in its grapes. This great concentration, combined with marked acidity, give the Eola-Amity Hills wines—namely Pinot noir—their distinct character. While the region covers 40,000 acres, no more than 1,400 acres are covered in vine.

Pinot Noir

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One of the most finicky yet rewarding grapes to grow, Pinot Noir is a labor of love for many. However, the greatest red wines of Burgundy prove that it is unquestionably worth the effort. In fact, it is the only red variety permitted in Burgundy. Highly reflective of its terroir, Pinot Noir prefers calcareous soils and a cool climate, requires low yields to achieve high quality and demands a lot of attention in the vineyard and winery. It retains even more glory as an important component of Champagne as well as on its own in France’s Loire Valley and Alsace regions. This sensational grape enjoys immense international success, most notably growing in Oregon, California and New Zealand with smaller amounts in Chile, Germany (as Spätburgunder) and Italy (as Pinot Nero).

In the Glass

Pinot Noir is all about red fruit—strawberry, raspberry and cherry with some heftier styles delving into the red or purple plum and in the other direction, red or orange citrus. It is relatively pale in color with soft tannins and a lively acidity. With age (of which the best examples can handle an astounding amount) it can develop hauntingly alluring characteristics of fresh earth, savory spice, dried fruit and truffles.

Perfect Pairings

Pinot’s healthy acidity cuts through the oiliness of pink-fleshed fish like salmon and tuna but its mild mannered tannins give it enough structure to pair with all sorts of poultry: chicken, quail and especially duck. As the namesake wine of Boeuf Bourguignon, Pinot noir has proven it isn’t afraid of beef. California examples work splendidly well with barbecue and Pinot Noir is also vegetarian-friendly—most notably with any dish that features mushrooms.

Sommelier Secret

For administrative purposes, the region of Beaujolais is often included in Burgundy. But it is extremely different in terms of topography, soil and climate, and the important red grape here is ultimately Gamay. Truth be told, there is a tiny amount of Gamay sprinkled around the outlying parts of Burgundy (mainly in Maconnais) but it isn’t allowed with any great significance and certainly not in any Villages or Cru level wines.

PBC9189183_2015 Item# 166641