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Pascual Toso Brut

Non-Vintage Sparkling Wine from Mendoza, Argentina
    12% ABV
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    Currently Unavailable $12.99
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    4.0 5 Ratings
    12% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    This sparkling wine is bright and clear with a touch of pale yellow. The aroma displays a bouquet of perfectly balanced yeasts with the Chardonnay used for this basic wine. Over time, this evolves and gains complexity in the bottle. The aroma is complemented by the flavor and has a gentle, soft, fresh taste which makes it enjoyable to drink.

    Best served chilled as an aperitif, or accompanying any celebration!

    Critical Acclaim

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    Pascual Toso

    Pascual Toso

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    Pascual Toso , Mendoza, Argentina
    When in the mid 1880s Pascual Toso set out towards Argentina from its home town, Canale D’Alba, in Piamonte, Italy, he could not have imagined that he would become the founder of a winery, which is today one of the oldest and most prestigious wineries in Argentina.

    When he arrived in Argentina, he settled in Mendoza. As he had been closely involved in the development of his family wine business in Piedmont, he promptly saw the promising future for winemaking in the region and decided to use his expertise. Thus, in 1890, Pascual Toso established his first winery in San José, Guaymallén.

    At the beginning of the 20th century, he decided to expand his business and acquired vineyards in Maipú. At his estate "Las Barrancas", he built another winery, "Las Barrancas" (small Canyon) which is dedicated to producing and growing the finest grapes.

    By far the largest and best-known winemaking province in Argentina, Mendoza is responsible for over 70% of the country’s enological output. Set in the eastern foothills of the Andes Mountains, the climate is dry and continental, presenting relatively few challenges for viticulturists during the growing season. Mendoza, divided into several distinctive sub-regions, including Luján de Cuyo and the Uco Valley, is the source of some of the country’s finest wines.

    For many wine lovers, Mendoza is practically synonymous with Malbec. Originally a Bordelaise variety brought to Argentina by the French in the mid-1800s, here it found success and renown that it never knew in its homeland where a finicky climate gives mixed results. Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah, Merlot and Pinot Noir are all widely planted here as well (and sometimes even blended with each other or Malbec). Mendoza's main white varieties include Chardonnay, Torrontés, Sauvignon Blanc and Sémillon.

    Champagne & Sparkling

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    Equal parts festive and food-friendly, sparkling wine is beloved for its lively bubbles and appealing aesthetics. Though it is often thought of as something to be reserved for celebrations, sparkling wine can be enjoyed on any occasion—and might just make the regular ones feel a bit more special. Sparkling wine is made throughout the world, but can only be called “Champagne” if it comes from the Champagne region of France. Other regions have their own specialties, like Prosecco in Italy and Cava in Spain. Sweet or dry, white or rosé (or even red!), lightly fizzy or fully sparkling, there is a style of bubbly wine to suit every palate.

    The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, trapping carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. Champagne, Cava and many other sparkling wines (particularly in the New World) are made using the “traditional method,” in which the second fermentation takes place inside the bottle. With this method, dead yeast cells remain in contact with the wine during bottle aging, giving it a creamy mouthful and toasty flavors. For Prosecco, the carbonation process occurs in a stainless steel tank to preserve the fresh fruity and floral aromas preferred for this style of wine.

    QUITSBRNV7_0 Item# 235869