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Paolo e Noemia d'Amico Falesia Chardonnay del Lazio 2011

Chardonnay from Lazio, Italy
    13.5% ABV
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    13.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Golden yellow with amber undertones, Falesia has an intense and complex scent where the aroma of ripe fruit is elegantly blended with notes of butter and vanilla. On the palate it is smooth and well-balanced with a harmonic finish. Well suited for starter, rice, and with shellfish, fish, and white meat with mild sauces and fresh cheese, the Falesia is a wonderfully versatile Chardonnay.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Paolo e Noemia d'Amico

    Paolo e Noemia d'Amico

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    Paolo e Noemia d'Amico, Lazio, Italy
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    In 1985, Paolo and Noemia d’Amico founded a winery based in their mutual life experiences of elegance and luxury. Paolo’s family kept an extensive wine collection that influenced him from a young age. Noemia’s Portuguese family brought their historical wine tradition to Brazil when they immigrated to Rio de Janeiro. The pair took their shared passion for wine and formed Paolo e Neomia D’Amico, a name that describes the deep connection that founded their winery.

    D’Amico wines are heavily influenced by the ancient volcanic landscape of Viano, from the soil to the cellars, which are made out of the local volcanic Tufo stone. D’Amico wines have received accolades from VinItaly, James Suckling, Robert Parker, and in Bebienda Magazine, Conde Nast Traveler, Gosto, and more.

    Known as the ancient homeland of the Latins, today there is a vigorus wine industry beyond the city limits of modern, bustling Rome. The Cesanese grape, full of red berry, spice and rose, is responsible for Lazio’s only true local reds. Lazio’s most famous white wine, called Frascati, is based on the local Malvasia del Lazio and Trebbiano Toscana. A sweet version, called Cannellino di Frascati, is also made.

    Chardonnay

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    One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it is grown and how it is made. While practically every country in the wine producing world grows it, Chardonnay from its Burgundian homeland produces some of the most remarkable and longest lived examples. As far as cellar potential, white Burgundy rivals the world’s other age-worthy whites like Riesling or botrytized Semillon. California is Chardonnay’s second most important home, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia and South America are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

    In the Glass

    When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay flavors tend towards grapefruit, lemon zest, green apple, celery leaf and wet flint, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of melon, peach and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut and spice, while malolactic fermentation imparts a soft and creamy texture.

    Perfect Pairings

    Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with flaky white fish with herbs, scallops, turkey breast and soft cheeses. Richer Chardonnays marry well with lobster, crab, salmon, roasted chicken and creamy sauces.

    Sommelier Secret

    Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. In Burgundy, the subregion of Chablis, while typically employing the use of older oak barrels, produces a similar bright and acid-driven style. Anyone who doesn't like oaky Chardonnay would likely enjoy its lighter style.

    CCIPNDFAL11_2011 Item# 132283