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Montevina Aleatico (half-bottle) 1997

Muscat from Sierra Foothills, California
    0% ABV
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    Winemaker Notes

    This delightful, ruby-hued dessert wine displays a complex, fragrant bouquet of rose petals, cranberry, peach, and lychee fruit, with succulent, mouthfilling peach and cranberry flavors. It is delightful either as a sweet aperitif or with lighter desserts such as fresh fruit, fruit compotes, and berry tarts.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Montevina

    Montevina Winery

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    Montevina Winery, Sierra Foothills, California
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    In the 1850's, Italian immigrants flocked to California's Sierra Nevada to prospect for gold. After the mines ran dry, many of these wine-loving fortune seekers became grape growers and vintners. In 1990, Montevina, the Sierra's flagship winery, began cultivating classic Italian grape varieties along with its hearalded Zinfandel in its 260-acre, organically farmed Amador County estate vineyards.

    Sierra Foothills

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    Originally a source of oenological sustenance for gold-seeking miners of the mid-1800s, the Sierra Foothills was the first region in California to produce wines from European grape varieties. Located between Sacramento and the Nevada border, this area’s immigrant settlers chose to forgo growing the then-ubiquitous Mission grape and instead brought with them superior vines from the Old World to plant alongside mining camps.

    Zinfandel has been the most important variety of this region since its inception, taking on a spicy character with brambly fruit and firm structure. Amador and El Dorado counties, benefiting from the presence of volcanic and granite soils, are home to the best examples. Bold, robust Rhône Blends and Barbera are also important regional specialties.

    Alluringly aromatic and delightful, Muscat never takes itself too seriously. Muscat is actually an umbrella name for a diverse set of grapes, some of which are genetically related and some of which, are not. The two most important versions are the noble, Muscat blanc à Petits Grains, making wines of considerable quality and Muscat of Alexandria, thought to be a progeny of the former. Both are grown throughout the world and can be made in a wide range of styles from dry to sweet, still to sparkling and even fortified. It is well known in Italy's Piedmont region for Moscato d’Asti, a slightly sparkling, semi-sweet, refreshing wine that is low in alcohol. On the Iberian peninsula, it goes by Moscatel, not to be confused with Bordeaux's Muscadelle, which is acutally unrelated.

    In the Glass

    Muscat wines possess marked aromatics and flavors of peach, pear, Meyer lemon, orange, orange blossom, rose petal, jasmine, honeysuckle or lychee, often with a hint of sweet spice.

    Perfect Pairings

    Thanks to its naturally low alcohol levels, Muscat is a perfect match for spicy Asian cuisine, especially when the wine has a little bit of residual sugar. Off-dry Muscat can work well with lighter desserts like key lime pie and lemon meringue, while fully sweet Muscat-based dessert wines are enjoyable after dinner with an assortment of cheeses.

    Sommelier Secret

    Muscat is one of the oldest known grape varieties, dating as far back as the days of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Pliny the Elder wrote in the 13th century of a sweet, perfumed grape variety so attractive to bees that he referred to it as uva apiana, or “grape of the bees.” Most likely, he was describing one of the Muscat varieties.

    CGM27466_1997 Item# 21464