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Montevertine Rosso di Toscana 2010

Other Red Blends from Tuscany, Italy
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    Winemaker Notes

    Montevertine's policy of strict reliance on Sangiovese with a small complement of Colorino and Canaiolo is in direct contradiction to the approach of the "super-Tuscan" group of wines which purposely include non-local grape varieties like Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Merlot in their blends. Despite the formal lack of the appellation, Montevertine is one of the rare examples of a true Chianti Classico.

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    Montevertine

    Montevertine

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    Montevertine, Tuscany, Italy
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    Montevertine lies within the heart of the Chianti hills, in the community of Radda at an altitude of 425 m above sea level. Documents show that the site has been dwelled since the 11th century. Traces of the original construction, which undoubtedly was of defensive nature and which later on had been converted to a rural housing, are still preserved.

    In 1967, Sergio Manetti, at that time a manufacturer of steel products, bought Montevertine as a holiday house. He restored the house and returned it to its original dwelling destination, and right from the beginning, he planted two hectares of wine and he set up a small cellar. The idea was to produce some wine for friends and customers. The first vintage produced, 1971, was more than decent and Sergio Manetti decided to present some bottles at Italy's leading wine show, Vinitaly in Verona, via the Chamber of Commerce of Siena. That was an immediate success and Mr. Manetti was so enthusiastic about it that only a few years later he decided to give up his main former activity, in order to dedicate all his efforts exclusively to winemaking. New vineyards were planted, new cellars installed, and that activity has been continued without any interruption. The expansion of our enterprise has been going on until this very moment.

    After Sergio Manetti had passed away in November 2000, the management of the vineyard is now in the hands of his son Martino Manetti, who is assisted by Bruno Bini, born in Montevertine and an in-depth expert of the zone and the soil. Giulio Gambelli, the expert wine taster, is our consultant and offers his assistance during the production of the vines.

    One of the most iconic Italian regions for wine, scenery, and history, Tuscany is the world’s most important outpost for the Sangiovese grape. Ranging in style from fruity and simple to complex and age-worthy, as well as in price from budget-friendly to ultra-premium, Sangiovese makes up a significant percentage of plantings here, with the white Trebbiano Toscano trailing far behind.

    Within Tuscany, many esteemed wines have their own respective sub-zones, including Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino, and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano. The climate is Mediterranean and the topography consists mostly of picturesque rolling hills, perfect for Sangiovese as it ripens most efficiently on slopes with maximum exposure to sunlight.

    Sangiovese at its simplest produces straightforward pizza-friendly wines with bright red fruit and not much more, but at its best it shows remarkable complexity. Top-quality Sangiovese-based wines can be expressive of a range of characteristics such as sour cherry, balsamic, dried herbs, leather, fresh earth, dried flowers, anise and tobacco. Brunello in particular is sensitive to vintage variation, performing best in years that are not too hot and not too cold. Chianti is associated with tangy and food-friendly dry wines at various price points. A more recent phenomenon as of the 1970s is the “Super Tuscan”—a wine made from international grape varieties like Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Syrah, with or without Sangiovese. These are common in Tuscany’s coastal regions like Bolgheri, Val di Cornia, the island of Elba and more inland, in Carmignano.

    Other Red Blends

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    With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World experimentation is permitted and encouraged. Blending can be utilized to create complex wines with many different layers of flavors and aromas, or to create more balanced wines. For example, a variety that is soft and full-bodied may be combined with one that is lighter with naturally high acidity. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

    TEFMVMV101_2010 Item# 123683