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McWilliam's Hanwood Estate Chardonnay 2013

Chardonnay from Australia
    13.5% ABV
    • WW88
    • JH90
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    13.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    The dominant varietal nose with intense peach, nectarine and rock melon gives a very positive first impression. These characters are complemented with tropical notes of guava and rock melon. Combined with subtle light biscuit and nutty aromas. Sweet intense peach and citrus flavors are prevalent on this rich palate along with hints of rockmelon. Showing lovely texture, the palate is balanced with some clean citrus acidity, providing good length and structure. Light hints of French oak provides tightness and length, with some creamy mouth feel provide a finish that is long and fresh, with a balanced, clean end.

    Critical Acclaim

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    McWilliam's

    McWilliam's

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    McWilliam's , Australia
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    The McWilliam family name stands for a long history of excellence in winemaking, a tradition which stretches back to the earliest days of the Australian wine industry. Since 1877, when founder Samuel McWilliam first planted vines on the banks of the Murray River in New South Wales, the McWilliam family have produced six consecutive generations of winemakers.

    The wines made by McWilliam’s are more than just benchmark expressions of Australian winemaking. They are wines that draw on more than 135 years of experience, wines that tell a story of a family’s passion for winemaking.

    Since the time Samuel McWilliam planted his first vines, the McWilliam family history has been closely intertwined with the stories of the New South Wales and Australian wine industries. From JJ McWilliam’s ambitious plan to pioneer Griffith as a wine region to more recent viticultural ventures in other parts of New South Wales, the McWilliam family has been a leader in the journey that has seen Australian wines move to the forefront of international respect and popularity. From humble beginnings, the family winery has continued to grow in size and stature. The knowledge, skill and passion that results from such a long family involvement in the Australian wine industry is the reason behind the quality and distinction of each bottle of wine produced by McWilliam’s.

    A philosophy of excellence in winemaking has been the backbone of the family vision for over a century, with a particular emphasis on sourcing the finest fruit possible. The continued popularity and acclaim for the wines of McWilliam’s is testament to an unfaltering mission that has been carried from each generation to the next, like a family heirloom.

    Today, McWilliam’s sources from vineyards in premium wine regions across New South Wales, including the Riverina, Hilltops, Tumbarumba and Orange. The family has honoured Samuel McWilliam’s faith in the value of the New South Wales land and climate by continuing to lead and further the growth of the local wine industry.

    Australia

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    A large, climatically diverse country producing just about every wine style imaginable, Australia is not just a source of blockbuster Shiraz or inexpensive wine with cute labels, though both can certainly be found here. Australia has a grand winemaking history and some of the oldest vines on the planet, along with a huge range of landscapes and climates; it is impossible to make generalizations about Australian wine. Most regions are concentrated in the south of the country with those inland experiencing warm, dry weather, and those in more coastal areas receiving humid and tropical, or maritime weather patterns. Australia has for several decades been at the forefront of winemaking technology and has widely adopted the use of screwcaps, even for some premium and ultra-premium bottles.

    Shiraz is indeed Australia’s most celebrated and widely planted variety, typically producing bold, supple reds with sweet, jammy fruit and performing best in the Barossa and Hunter Valleys. Cabernet Sauvignon is often blended with Shiraz, and also shines on its own particularly in Coonawarra and Margaret River. Grenache and Mourvèdre (often locally referred to as Mataro) are also popular, both on their own and alongside Shiraz in Rhône blends. Chardonnay is common throughout the country and made in a wide range of styles. Sauvignon Blanc has recently surged in popularity to compete with New Zealand’s distinctive version, and Semillon is often utilized as its blending partner, or in the Hunter Valley, on its own to make complex, age-worthy whites. Riesling thrives in the cool-climate Clare and Eden Valleys. Sticky-sweet fortified wine Rutherglen Muscat is a beloved regional specialty of Victoria. Thanks to the country’s relatively agreeable climate throughout and the openness of its people, experimentation is common and ongoing, and there are a vast array of intriguing varieties to be found.

    Chardonnay

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    One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it is grown and how it is made. While practically every country in the wine producing world grows it, Chardonnay from its Burgundian homeland produces some of the most remarkable and longest lived examples. As far as cellar potential, white Burgundy rivals the world’s other age-worthy whites like Riesling or botrytized Semillon. California is Chardonnay’s second most important home, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia and South America are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

    In the Glass

    When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay flavors tend towards grapefruit, lemon zest, green apple, celery leaf and wet flint, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of melon, peach and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut and spice, while malolactic fermentation imparts a soft and creamy texture.

    Perfect Pairings

    Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with flaky white fish with herbs, scallops, turkey breast and soft cheeses. Richer Chardonnays marry well with lobster, crab, salmon, roasted chicken and creamy sauces.

    Sommelier Secret

    Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. In Burgundy, the subregion of Chablis, while typically employing the use of older oak barrels, produces a similar bright and acid-driven style. Anyone who doesn't like oaky Chardonnay would likely enjoy its lighter style.

    ALL2060140_2013 Item# 143204