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Lungarotti Chardonnay 2000

Chardonnay from Italy
    0% ABV
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    Winemaker Notes

    Produced with grapes grown on the Miralduolo estate, this wine has the elegant lightness that even a white wine with solid structure must possess.

    Color: Brilliant straw yellow.
    Aroma: Light and fruity.
    Taste: Dry and harmonious, with a medium-bodied, fruit-focused structure.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Lungarotti

    Lungarotti

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    Lungarotti, Italy
    Image of winery
    Created by Dott. Giorgio Lungarotti in 1962, the Lungarotti Winery has built its reputation on a legacy of firsts in Italian winemaking. Lungarotti’s Torre di Giano and Rubesco wines were the first wines from Umbria, and some of the first in Italy to, in 1968, be granted DOC status. In 1990, the single-vineyard Rubesco Riserva “Vigna Monticchio” achieved DOCG status. In the 1970s, Teresa Severini Lungarotti became Italy’s first women enologist, and, having joined her father upon graduation from the University of Perugia, is the chief enologist at the Lungarotti Winery. In 1998, Giorgio’s youngest daughter, Chiara, graduated with her degree in agriculture and has taken charge of the viticulture program at Lungarotti. The Lungarotti sisters are a dedicated winemaking team, who continue their father’s proud legacy, leading the Umbrian wine industry in quality and innovation.

    Named “Oenotria” by the ancient Greeks for its abundance of grapevines, Italy has always had a culture that is virtually inextricable from wine. Wine grapes are grown just about everywhere throughout the country—a long and narrow boot-shaped peninsula extending into the Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas. The defining geographical feature of the country is the Apennine Mountain range, extending from Liguria in the north to Calabria in the south. The island of Sicily nearly grazes the toe of Italy’s boot, while Sardinia lies to the country’s west. Climate varies significantly throughout the country, with temperature being somewhat more dependent on elevation than latitude, though it is safe to generalize that the south is warmer. Much of the highest quality viticulture takes place on gently rolling, picturesque hillsides.

    Italy boasts more indigenous varieties than any other country—between 500 and 800, depending on whom you ask—and most wine production relies upon these native grapes. In some regions, international varieties have worked their way in, but their use is declining in popularity, especially as younger growers begun to take interest in rediscovering forgotten local specialties. Sangiovese is the most widely planted variety in the country, reaching its greatest potential in parts of Tuscany. Nebbiolo is the prized grape of Piedmont in the northwest, producing singular, complex and age-worthy wines. Other important varieties include Montepulciano, Trebbiano, Barbera, Nero d’Avola, and of course, Pinot Grigio.

    Chardonnay

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    One of the most popular and versatile white wine grapes, Chardonnay offers a wide range of flavors and styles depending on where it’s grown and how it’s made. In Burgundy, Chardonnay produces some of the finest white wines in the world, typically tending towards minimal intervention in the winery and at its best resulting in remarkable longevity. This grape is popular throughout the world, but perhaps its second most important home is in California, where both oaky, buttery styles and leaner, European-inspired wines enjoy great popularity. Oregon, Australia, South America, South Africa, and New Zealand are also significant producers of Chardonnay.

    In the Glass

    When planted on cool sites, Chardonnay’s flavors tend towards grapefruit, green apple, minerals, and white stone fruit, while warmer locations coax out richer, more tropical flavors of fig, melon, and pineapple. Oak can add notes of vanilla, coconut, and spice (as well as texture), while malolactic fermentation can impart soft, buttery acidity.

    Perfect Pairings

    Chardonnay is as versatile at the table as it is in the vineyard. The crisp, clean, Chablis-like styles go well with simple seafood, light chicken dishes, and salads. Richer Chardonnays marry well with cream or oil-based sauces.

    Sommelier Secret

    Since the 1990s, big, oaky, buttery Chardonnays from California have enjoyed explosive popularity. More recently, the pendulum has begun to swing in the opposite direction, towards a clean, crisp style that rarely utilizes new oak. These Old-World style wines have been dubbed the “New California Chardonnays,” and anyone who claims they do not like Chardonnay should give them a try.

    FED71244_2000 Item# 45336