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Luna Vineyards Sangiovese 2008

Sangiovese from Napa Valley, California
    14.6% ABV
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    14.6% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    The backbone of our 2008 Sangiovese comes from the Game Farm Vineyard in Oakville.The vineyard lies in dense, stony subsoil that mimics mountain growing conditions. It wasselected for its Brunello clone and shallow, rocky soil. In these soils, the Sangiovesestruggles to produce the highest quality grapes possible. The balance of the grapes weregrown in the heart of the Napa Valley. The 2008 harvest was nearly ideal with pickingbeginning earlier than average.

    Our 2008 Napa Valley Sangiovese is a deep garnet color. Perfumed aromas of raspberries,black cherries, lilacs, and rose petals come forward on the nose. The Merlot supports achewy currant core on the mid-palate, accented by chocolate and hints of sandalwood. Aninteresting mineral note appears on the back of the palate, and firm, silky tannins hold thewine together. The finish is a lush thirty second trail of perfectly ripe, Bing cherries.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Luna Vineyards

    Luna Vineyards

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    Luna Vineyards, Napa Valley, California
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    Luna Vineyards was founded in 1995 by George Vare and Mike Moone. Both Vare and Moone have been Presidents of major California wineries and important influences in the California wine industry since the mid-1960's.

    The founders purchased the St. Andrews winery, located at the foot of the Silverado Trail in Napa Valley, and set out to produce Italian varietal wines - Pinot Grigio, Sangiovese and Merlot.

    In 1996, after 20 years experience with other wineries, the last 13 at Newton Vineyards where he established himself in the forefront of Napa Valley winemakers, Winemaster John Kongsgaard joined Luna as Vice President and partner. John is particularly noted for his outstanding Merlots and spent seven years in collaboration with Michel Rolland from Bordeaux perfecting winemaking techniques in the Napa region.

    With a passion for Italian wines combined with a desire to live slightly on the edge, John happily joined Luna. He was excited by the opportunity to travel to the "Old World" and learn how to adapt their traditional and new techniques for growing grapes and making wine from Sangiovese and Pinot Grigio.

    Napa Valley

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    One of the world's most highly regarded regions for wine production as well as tourism, the Napa Valley was responsible for bringing worldwide recognition to California winemaking. In the 1960s, a few key wine families settled the area and hedged their bets on the valley's world-class winemaking potential—and they were right.

    The Napa wine industry really took off in the 1980s, when producers scooped up vineyard lands and planted vines throughout the county. A number of wineries emerged, and today Napa is home to hundreds of producers ranging from boutique to corporate. Cabernet Sauvignon is definitely the grape of choice here, with many winemakers also focusing on Bordeaux blends. Napa whites are usually Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc.

    Within the Napa Valley lie many smaller sub-AVAs that claim specific characteristics based on situation, slope and soil. Farthest south and coolest from the influence of the San Pablo Bay is Carneros, followed by Coombsville to its northeast and then Yountville, Oakville and Rutherford. Above those are the warm St. Helena and the valley's newest and hottest AVA, Calistoga. These areas follow the valley floor and are known generally for creating rich, dense, complex and smooth reds with good aging potential. The mountain sub appellations, nestled on the slopes overlooking the valley AVAs, include Stags Leap District, Atlas Peak, Chiles Valley (farther east), Howell Mountain, Mt. Veeder, Spring Mountain District and Diamond Mountain District. Wines from the mountain regions are often more structured and firm, benefiting from a lot of time in the bottle to evolve and soften.

    Sangiovese

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    The perfect intersection of bright red fruit and savory earthiness, Sangiovese is among Itaaly's elite red grape varieties and is responsible for the best red wines of Tuscany. While it is best known as the chief component of Chianti, it is also the main grape in Vino Nobile di Montepulciano and reaches the height of its power and intensity in the complex, long-lived Brunello di Montalcino

    Elsewhere throughout Italy, Sangiovese plays an important role in many easy-drinking, value-driven red blends and on the French island of Corsica, under the name Nielluccio, it produces excellent bright and refreshing red and rosé wines with a personality of their own. Sangiovese has also enjoyed success growing in California and Washington.

    In the Glass

    Sangiovese is a medium-bodied red with qualities of tart cherry, plum, sun dried tomato, fresh tobacco and herbs. High-quality, well-aged examples can take on tertiary notes of smoke, leather, game, potpourri and dried fruit. Corsican Nielluccio is distinguished by a subtle perfume of dried flowers.

    Perfect Pairings

    Sangiovese is the ultimate pizza and pasta red—its high acidity, moderate alcohol, and fine-grained tannins create a perfect symbiosis with tomato-based dishes, braised vegetables, roasted and cured meat, hard cheese and anything off the barbecue.

    Sommelier Secret

    Although it is the star variety of Tuscany, cult-classic “Super-Tuscan” wines may actually contain no Sangiovese at all! Since the 1970s, local winemakers have been producing big, bold wines as a blend of one or more of several international varieties—usually Cabernet Sauvignon, Cabernet Franc, Merlot or Syrah—with or without Sangiovese.

    LIM233663750_2008 Item# 108273