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Luna Nuda Rose 2017

Rosé from Italy
    12.5% ABV
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    12.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    The Luna Nuda 2017 Rosé is bright and lively displaying a brilliant pink color in the glass. This vintage is primarily made of Montepulciano, an Italian grape variety that is very concentrated in color. Montepulciano originates in central Italy and is the second most planted red grape in the country after Sangiovese. Fruit for the Luna Nuda 2017 Rosé guarantees structure and alluring, fruity aromatics while maintaining freshness and acidity in the finish. Aromas of strawberry bouquets and floral notes are followed by subtle citrus on the palate. Luna Nuda Rosé is divine paired with bruschetta topped with prosciutto, ricotta and arugula.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Luna Nuda

    Luna Nuda

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    Luna Nuda, Italy
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    Luna Nuda comes from one of the best places in the world for growing Pinot Grigio grapes – Italy's Alto Adige Valley. This 100% Pinot Grigio is sourced from the family-owned Castelfeder Estate. It is handcrafted, and bio dynamically farmed. Luna Nuda is the Italian phrase, meaning "Naked Moon" often used by vintners to describe a clear night sky with a bright full moon shining and shimmering over the beautiful Italian countryside.

    Named “Oenotria” by the ancient Greeks for its abundance of grapevines, Italy has always had a culture virtually inextricable from wine. Wine grapes grow in every region throughout the country—a long and narrow boot-shaped peninsula extending into the Mediterranean. Naturally, most Italian regions enjoy a Mediterranean climate and a notable coastline, if not coastline on all borders, as is the case with the islands of Sicily and Sardinia.

    The Alps in the northern regions of Valle d'Aosta, Lombardy and Alto Adige as examples, create favorable conditions for cool-climate varieties, while the Apennine Mountains, extending from Liguria in the north to Calabria in the south, affect climate, grape variety and harvest periods throughout. Considering its variable terrain and conditions, it's still safe to say that most high quality viticulture in Italy takes place on picturesque hillsides.

    Italy boasts more indigenous varieties than any other country—between 500 and 800, depending on whom you ask—and most wine production relies upon these native grapes. In some regions, international varieties have worked their way in, but are declining in popularity, especially as younger growers take interest in reviving local varieties. Most important are Sangiovese, reaching its greatest potential in Tuscany and Nebbiolo, the prized grape of Piedmont, producing single varietal, age-worthy wines. Other important varieties include Corvina, Montepulciano, Barbera, Nero d’Avola and of course the whites, Pinot Grigio and Trebbiano. The list goes on.

    Rosé Wine

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    Whether it’s playful and fun or savory and serious, most rosé today is not your grandmother’s White Zinfandel, though that category remains strong. Pink wine has recently become quite trendy, and this time around it’s commonly quite dry. It is produced throughout the world from a vast array of grape varieties, but the most successful sources are California, southern France (particularly Provence), and parts of Spain and Italy.

    Since the pigment in red wines comes from keeping fermenting juice in contact with the grape skins for an extended period, it follows that a pink wine can be made using just a brief period of skin contact—usually just a couple of days. The resulting color will depend on the grape variety and the winemaking style, ranging from pale salmon to deep magenta. These wines are typically fresh and fruity, fermented at cool temperatures in stainless steel to preserve the primary aromas and flavors. Most rosé, with a few notable exceptions, should be drunk rather young, within a few years of the vintage.

    LNJLNR75_2017 Item# 508241