Louis Roederer Brut Rose 2010 Front Label
Louis Roederer Brut Rose 2010 Front Label

Louis Roederer Brut Rose 2010

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  • WS93
750ML / 12% ABV
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4.5 6 Ratings
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4.5 6 Ratings
750ML / 12% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Pure, precise, fresh. Delicate pink color with slightly blue glints. Lively stream of fine bubbles. The pure, precise bouquet mingles sweet flowers (honeysuckle and lily), slightly acid red fruits (redcurrant, wild strawberry) and citrus zest (mandarin). Warm, deeply reassuring and inviting notes then appear with a smokiness and ripeness typical of Louis Roederer. Precision and purity are echoed on the palate with a crunchy, mature attack of Pinot Noir from the south-facing Cumieres slopes, escorted by the almost acidfreshness of the Chardonnays from the north-facing Chouilly slopes. After aerating for a few moments, the mid-palate comes together in a unique, rounded whole. The flavors of ripe, juicy fruit blend in a texture that is both smooth and fresh, free from heaviness. A sensation of finesse and elegance in the long finish.

Blend: 62% Pinot Noir, 38% Chardonnay

Critical Acclaim

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W&S 96
Wine & Spirits
Roederer invested in a separate winery to produce its rosé, the facility completed in 2007, taking its classic saignée method wines to a new level. An estate-grown blend of pinot noir from the clay soils of Cumières with chardonnay from the Côte des Blancs, this is an extraordinary vintage of Roederer Rosé. It’s a lithe wine, compelling for its precision rather than for any stylized complexity. In fact, it feels simple, naked, capturing the freshness of the grapes in pale pink energy. The transparent cherry and Honeycrisp apple flavors are inherently balanced and hard to resist.
WW 96
Wilfred Wong of Wine.com
Simply magnificent, the 2010 Louis Roederer Champagne Rosé is a multi-dimensional wine. From its aromas—wild strawberries, delicate flowers and light chalk—to its persistent flavors and long finish, this is authentic bubbly from the Champagne district. Tasting great now, this wine will age nicely over the next half a dozen years. (Tasted: June 22, 2016, San Francisco, CA)
WE 95
Wine Enthusiast
Beautifully crisp and fresh, this is a young, tightly textured wine that is already so refreshing. Its red fruit character is just a part of the mineral and tannin texture and the pure line of fragrant acidity. Very pale in color, this sophisticated wine could do with some aging. Drink from 2018.
JS 95
James Suckling
The viticulture here takes its cues from Burgundy with lower yields (40hl/ha), leaf removal, ripe picking and cooling overnight and some cold soaking and skin contact. The chardonnay juice is added to bring the acidity and balance into play, but this also has attractive rose-like florals that really speak of pinot noir. There's orange zest and some pink grapefruit and even handy nutty elements that creep in. This is every bit as terrific as the 2008. The palate has roundness, flesh and smoothly arranged phenolics. An almost saline chardonnay influence provides a vinous attraction here. Super silky, and the chardonnay finishes it fresh but with a punch. Drink now.
WS 93
Wine Spectator
A vivacious rosé, marrying a delicate palate of white raspberry, pastry, blanched almond and white cherry flavors with citrusy acidity and an airy mousse. Rich smoke and mineral notes shine on the finish. Drink now through 2025.
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Louis Roederer

Louis Roederer

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Louis Roederer, France
Louis Roederer Winery Video
Uncompromising Quality
Champagne Louis Roederer was founded in 1776 in Reims, France and is one of the rare family owned companies, which is still managed by the Roederer family. In 1833, Louis Roederer inherited the company from his uncle and renamed the company under his namesake. Under his leadership, the company rapidly grew while remaining true to their philosophy of uncompromising quality. Today, the company is under the helm of Jean-Claude Rouzaud and his son Frédéric who continue to place quality before quantity.

First-Rate Vineyards
Champagne Louis Roederer is one of the only French champagne producers to own nearly 75 percent of the grapes in the most desirable vineyards in the Champagne. The property is located on 450 acres in the finest villages of Montagne de Reims, Côtes des Blancs, and Valleé de la Marne. Each region is selected to produce Chardonnay and Pinot Noir with the elegance needed for perfectly balanced champagne. The Louis Roederer vineyards rate an average 98 percent based on France’s statutory 100-point classification scale.

The reserve wine is then tasted and graded by a team of Roederer specialists. They choose as many as 40 different wines from several lots for the blend. For the final touch, the wine is then added in order to enhance the cuvee and guarantee consistency while retaining the champagne's characteristics.

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Champagne

France

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Associated with luxury, celebration, and romance, the region, Champagne, is home to the world’s most prized sparkling wine. In order to bear the label, ‘Champagne’, a sparkling wine must originate from this northeastern region of France—called Champagne—and adhere to strict quality standards. Made up of the three towns Reims, Épernay, and Aÿ, it was here that the traditional method of sparkling wine production was both invented and perfected, birthing a winemaking technique as well as a flavor profile that is now emulated worldwide.

Well-drained, limestone and chalky soil defines much of the region, which lend a mineral component to its wines. Champagne’s cold, continental climate promotes ample acidity in its grapes but weather differences from year to year can create significant variation between vintages. While vintage Champagnes are produced in exceptional years, non-vintage cuvées are produced annually from a blend of several years in order to produce Champagnes that maintain a consistent house style.

With nearly negligible exceptions, . These can be blended together or bottled as individual varietal Champagnes, depending on the final style of wine desired. Chardonnay, the only white variety, contributes freshness, elegance, lively acidity and notes of citrus, orchard fruit and white flowers. Pinot Noir and its relative Pinot Meunier, provide the backbone to many blends, adding structure, body and supple red fruit flavors. Wines with a large proportion of Pinot Meunier will be ready to drink earlier, while Pinot Noir contributes to longevity. Whether it is white or rosé, most Champagne is made from a blend of red and white grapes—and uniquely, rosé is often produce by blending together red and white wine. A Champagne made exclusively from Chardonnay will be labeled as ‘blanc de blancs,’ while ones comprised of only red grapes are called ‘blanc de noirs.’

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What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

How is sparkling rosé wine made?

There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

SOU406808_2010 Item# 151938

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