Processing Your Order...

Search for ""

Update your browser to enjoy all that Wine.com has to offer.

It's easy to update and using the latest version
of Internet Explorer means all your web browsing will be better.

Yes, Update Now

Leasingham Magnus Cabernet Sauvignon/Shiraz 2001

Other Red Blends from Clare Valley, Australia
    0% ABV
    All Vintages
    Currently Unavailable $16.99
    Try the
    16 99
    16 99
    Save $0.00 (0%)
    Ships Mon, Dec 17
    Limit 0 bottles per customer
    Sold in increments of 0
    Add to Cart
    0
    Limit Reached
    0.0 0 Ratings
    My Wine Share
    Vintage Alert
    Alert me when new vintages are available
    Rate for better recommendations
    (256 characters remaining)
    Cancel Save

    0.0 0 Ratings
    0% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    This wine is deep ruby red in colour and has brilliant clarity. On the nose the wine displays lifted aromas of plum and black cherry with a hint of underlying earthy tobacco leaf. The palate shows sweet fruit flesh with finely textured tannins. Characters of mulberry and plum fruit are balanced with nutmeg spice and coffee mocha oak. The palate is soft and round with lingering persistence.

    Critical Acclaim

    All Vintages
    Leasingham

    Leasingham

    View all wine
    Leasingham, Clare Valley, Australia
    Image of winery
    Originally there were four pioneers : J.H. (Joseph) Knappstein, a merchant, Dr O. Wein-Smith, a medical practitioner of Clare, Magnus Badger, a solicitor, and John Cristion, who was a brewer of note. Alfred Basedow was employed as a General Manager and Winemaker, having learned the craft of winemaking in Europe. The name Stanley was chosen to identify the company with the local electoral district of Stanley. By 1912, Joseph Knappstein, one of the most enterprising men of his time in South Australia, had bought out the interests of the other three founders and gained control of the company.

    The Leasingham winery was acquired by The Hardy Wine Company in January 1988, when a major upgrade of vineyards, winery, tourism and promotional facilities was begun. Subsequently that year the Clarevale Co-operative was integrated giving access to further premium fruit. Today the name Leasingham is reserved for premium wines only. The Stanley name continues on a range of wine casks produced at the Buronga winery

    Clare Valley

    View all wine

    The Clare Valley is actually a series of narrow north to south valleys, each with a different soil type and slightly different weather patterns along their stretch. In the southern heartland between Watervale and Auburn, there is mainly a crumbled, red clay loam soil called terra-rossa and cool breezes come in from Gulf St. Vincent. A few miles north, in Polish Hill, is soft, red loam over clay and is influenced by westerlies blowing in from the Spencer Gulf.

    The differences in soil, elevation, degree of slope and weather enable the region to produce some of Australia’s finest, aromatic, spicy and lime-pithy Rieslings, as well as excellent Shiraz, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Malbec with ripe plummy fruit, good acid and big structure.

    Clare Valley is an isolated farming country with a continental climate known for its warm and sunny days, followed by cool nights—perfect for wine grapes’ development of sugar and phenolic ripeness in conjunction with notable acidity levels.

    Other Red Blends

    View all wine

    With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

    HPR679654_2001 Item# 75143