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Lamborghini Campoleone 2006

Other Red Blends from Italy
  • RP91
  • WS90
13.5% ABV
  • JS95
  • RP94
  • RP92
  • RP93
  • RP95
  • WE91
  • RP96
  • WS98
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13.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

This Merlot/Sangiovese blend has an extraordinary perfume of saddle leather, smoke, cassis, prunes, and plums. A rich full-bodied, voluptuously-textured wine, with layers of concentrated fruit and sweet tannins. A magnificent seamlessness with a huge, explosive long finish. It is a wine of great stature as well as intensity.

Critical Acclaim

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RP 91
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Dark cherries, smoke, licorice and earthiness are some of the nuances that emerge from 2006 Campoleone, a blend of Sangiovese and Merlot that spent 12 months in French oak. This is a decidedly dark, brooding red from Lamborghini. As good as it is, I can’t help feeling that the wine is trapped by excessive concentration and new oak. With a lighter touch this could be a truly important, benchmark wine for Umbria. Anticipated maturity: 2012-2021.
WS 90
Wine Spectator
Displays blackberry jam on the nose, with prune and dried flowers. Full and silky, with blueberry flavors, firm tannins and bright acidity. A subtle red, with pretty fruit and structure and a fruity finish. Best after 2010. 3,000 cases made.
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Lamborghini

Lamborghini

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Lamborghini, Italy
The vineyard. is situated in Umbria, on lake Trasimeno. Today this region is very well considered in the international market for its viticulture vacation. Aniong the traditional grapes of the area, Sangiovese, Gamay and Ciliegiolo. he decided to specialize in planting international grapes like Merlot and Cabernet Sauvignon as a considerable choice for the future. Front then many changes and investments have been made in order to develop the vineyards. With the building of the wine cellars in 1975 started the commercializing of the wines. Today the specialized development of the lands with its vineyards extends for over 32 hectares which 7 have been newly sown. The harvest 1997 was the beginning of a dramatic improvement of "La Fiorita " both regarding the management of the vineyards and the development of the wines. With the collaboration with Dr Riccardo Cotarella and the drastic reduction of the grapes we are now achieving our quality ambition. With our new interest in wine making we have obtained 2 new red wines: Trescone and Campoleone

Named “Oenotria” by the ancient Greeks for its abundance of grapevines, Italy has always had a culture that is virtually inextricable from wine. Wine grapes are grown just about everywhere throughout the country—a long and narrow boot-shaped peninsula extending into the Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas. The defining geographical feature of the country is the Apennine Mountain range, extending from Liguria in the north to Calabria in the south. The island of Sicily nearly grazes the toe of Italy’s boot, while Sardinia lies to the country’s west. Climate varies significantly throughout the country, with temperature being somewhat more dependent on elevation than latitude, though it is safe to generalize that the south is warmer. Much of the highest quality viticulture takes place on gently rolling, picturesque hillsides.

Italy boasts more indigenous varieties than any other country—between 500 and 800, depending on whom you ask—and most wine production relies upon these native grapes. In some regions, international varieties have worked their way in, but their use is declining in popularity, especially as younger growers begun to take interest in rediscovering forgotten local specialties. Sangiovese is the most widely planted variety in the country, reaching its greatest potential in parts of Tuscany. Nebbiolo is the prized grape of Piedmont in the northwest, producing singular, complex and age-worthy wines. Other important varieties include Montepulciano, Trebbiano, Barbera, Nero d’Avola and of course, Pinot Grigio.

Other Red Blends

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With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

HNYLBICAU06C_2006 Item# 113936