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La Fleur d'Or Sauternes (375ML half-bottle) 2011

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        Winemaker Notes

        La Fleur d'Or Sauternes has an elegant yellow appearance with aromas of candied apricot, peach, mango along side toasty hints. The palate has a vivacious attack with a remarkable balance between freshness and botrytis.

        Critical Acclaim

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        La Fleur d'Or

        La Fleur d'Or

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        La Fleur d'Or, France
        Originally conceived in 1995 by Sauternes expert Bill Blatch with the négociant firm Vintex, La Fleur d’Or combines top notch parcels of wine from small lesser-known properties as well as some from classified châteaux. The vineyards of the numerous small estates are mostly in Barsac, where the misty morning microclimate encourages the growth of Botrytis cinerea. The average age of the vines is approximately 35 years, and the soils are predominately red ferruginous (iron-rich) clay with some gravel. The botrytized grapes are hand-harvested, and the wine is traditionally vinified in small steel vats. The wine is then aged for one year in barrels, followed by an additional year in stainless steel vats. The final blend is always lively and fresh, with the hallmark notes of botrytis – a perfect wine for no fuss consumption.

        Nearly synonymous with fine wine and all things epicurean, France has a culture of wine production and consumption that is deeply rooted in tradition. Many of the world’s most beloved grape varieties originated here, as did the concept of “terroir”—soil type, elevation, slope angle and mesoclimate combine to produce resulting wines that convey a sense of place. Accordingly, most French wine is labeled by geographical location, rather than grape variety. So a general understaning of which grapes correspond to which regions can be helpful in navigating all of the types of French wine. Some of the greatest wine regions in the world are here, including Bordeaux, Burgundy, the Rhône, and Champagne, but each part of the country has its own specialties and strengths.

        Pinot Noir and Chardonnay, are the king and queen of Burgundy, producing elegant red and white wines with great acidity, the finest examples of which can age for decades. The same varieties, along with Pinot Meunier, are used in Champagne. Of comparable renown is Bordeaux, focused on bold, structured red wines made of blends of Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Cabernet Franc including sometimes a small amount of Petit Verdot or Malbec. The primary white varieties of Bordeaux are Sauvignon Blanc and Sémillon. The Rhône Valley is responsible for monovarietal Syrah in the north, while the south specializes in Grenache blends; Rhône's main white variety is Viognier.

        Most of these grape varieties are planted throughout the country and beyond, extending their influence into other parts of Europe and New World appellations.

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        Apart from the classics, we find many regional gems of different styles.

        Late harvest wines are probably the easiest to understand. Grapes are picked so late that the sugars build up and residual sugar remains after the fermentation process. Ice wine, a style founded in Germany and there referred to as eiswein, is an extreme late harvest wine, produced from grapes frozen on the vine, and pressed while still frozen, resulting in a higher concentration of sugar. It is becoming a specialty of Canada as well, where it takes on the English name of ice wine.

        Vin Santo, literally “holy wine,” is a Tuscan sweet wine made from drying the local white grapes Trebbiano Toscano and Malvasia in the winery and not pressing until somewhere between November and March.

        Rutherglen is an historic wine region in northeast Victoria, Australia, famous for its fortified Topaque and Muscat with complex tawny characteristics.

        HNYLFOSAU11B_2011 Item# 165648