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Koyle Reserva Cabernet Sauvignon 2008

Cabernet Sauvignon from Chile
  • RP90
14% ABV
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14% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The grapes were picked in selected lots, coming from three areas in Colchagua Valley: Los Lingues, Apalta and Lolol. The vineyards are carefully pruned, with stringent canopy management and a green harvest. At optimum ripeness, the grapes are hand-picked and brought to the cellar for sorting.

Intense ruby red color, the aroma is all about ripe black cherry, dried herbs, tobacco and dark coffee flavors. Plenty of freshness, the palate is all about red berries with a welcome note of elegant and fine tannins and a long and balanced finish. The wine can be cellared for up to five years.

Critical Acclaim

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RP 90
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Savory, ripe, complex flavors with some elegance, excellent value.
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Koyle
Koyle, Chile
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Koyle corresponds to the sixth generation of a long wine making tradition of the Undurraga family in Chile, started by Mr. Francisco Undurraga Vicuña in 1885.

Koyle vineyards were created in the year 2006, when Alfonso Undurraga Mackenna, together with his sons Alfonso, Max and Cristóbal, began searching for a terroir to develop a high quality red wines project.

After travelling through and analyzing different valleys and sectors of Chile, a property of approximately 1.100 hectares was acquired on the zone of Los Lingues, Alto Colchagua, on a buttress of the Los Andes mountain range. The climatic and soil characteristics of this property are key factors in obtaining an optimum terroir for making great quality wines.

One of South America’s most important wine-producing countries, Chile is a reliable source of both budget-friendly wines and premium bottlings. Spanish settlers, Juan Jufre and Diego Garcia de Cáceres, most likely brought Vitis vinifera (Europe’s wine producing vine species) to the Central Valley of Chile some time in the 1550s. But Chile’s modern wine industry is largely the result of heavy investment from the 1990s.

Long and narrow, Chile is geographically isolated, bordered by the Pacific Ocean to the west, the Andes Mountains to the east and the Atacama desert to the north. These natural borders allowed Chile to avoid the disastrous phylloxera infestation in the late 1800s and as a result, vines are often planted on their own rootstock rather than grafted (as is the case in much of the wine producing world).

Chile’s vineyards vary widely in climate and soil type from north to south. The Coquimbo region in the far north contains the Elqui and Limari Valleys, where minimal rainfall and intense sunlight are offset by chilly breezes from the Humboldt Current. While historically focused solely on Pisco production, today this area finds success with Chardonnay and Pinot Noir. The Aconcagua region contains the eponymous Aconcagua Valley—hot and dry and home to full-bodied red wines made from Cabernet Sauvignon, Syrah and Merlot—as well as Casablanca Valley and San Antonio Valley, which focus on Pinot Noir, Chardonnay and Sauvignon Blanc. The Central Valley is home to the Maipo, Rapel, Curicó and Maule Valleys, which produce a wide variety of red and white wines. Maipo in particular is known for Carmenère, Chile’s unofficial signature grape. In the up-and-coming southern regions of Bio Bio and Itata make excellent Riesling, Chardonnay and Pinot Noir.

Cabernet Sauvignon

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A noble variety bestowed with both power and concentration, Cabernet Sauvignon is now the world's most planted grape variety. Inherently high in tannins and acidity, the best bottlings of Cabernet can age beautifully, with the ability to last fifty years or more. Cabernet Sauvignon flourishes in temperate climates like Bordeaux's Medoc region and forms the base of the Medoc reds, which are typically mostly Cabernet with Merlot and smaller amounts of some combination of Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot. (Enjoying a great deal of success in various regions around the world, this blend is now globally referred to as a Bordeaux Blend.) Cabernet Sauvignon has enjoyed great success throughout the world, particularly in the Napa Valley, and is responsible for some of the world’s most prestigious and sought-after “cult” wines.

In the Glass

High in color, tannin and extract, Cabernet Sauvignon expresses notes of blackberry, cassis, plum, currant, spice and tobacco. In Bordeaux and elsewhere in the Old World you'll find the more earthy, tannic side of Cabernet, where it is typically blended to soften tannins and add complexity. In warmer regions like California Washington, Argentina, Chile and Australia, you can typically expect more ripe fruit flavors upfront.

Perfect Pairings

Cabernet Sauvignon is right at home with rich, intense meat dishes—beef, lamb and venison, in particular—where its opulent fruit and decisive tannins make an equal match to the dense protein of the meat. With a mature Cabernet, opt for tender, slow-cooked meat dishes.

Sommelier Secrets

Despite the modern importance and ubiquity of Cabernet Sauvignon, it is actually a relatively young variety. In 1997, DNA profiling revealed the grape to be a spontaneous crossing of Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc which took place in 17th century southwestern France.

MSW72501081_2008 Item# 110624