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Korbel Sparkling Natural 2000

Non-Vintage Sparkling Wine from Sonoma County, California
    0% ABV
    • WS86
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    Currently Unavailable $12.99
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    0% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Made entirely from premium Sonoma County Pinot Noir and Chardonnay grapes, our driest cuvee has a flawless balance and a satiny elegant finish.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Korbel

    Korbel

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    Korbel, Sonoma County, California
    Image of winery
    The Korbel Winery began operation in 1882. Two years later, noted winemaker Frank Hasek came to California from Prague and become the first Korbel champagne-master. Employing méthode champenoise, the time-honored French technique of producing champagne, the Korbels quietly experimented with various cuvées. And by the turn of the century, Korbel had become an internationally known and award-winning champagne label. The tradition was kept alive for the next half-century until 1954, when the winery was sold to Adolf Heck. Adolf Heck arrived in Sonoma with yeast cultures in hand. He brought and preserved them from his native Germany and they are still in use today. In 1956 he re-introduced Korbel Brut in a style that was lighter and drier than any American champagne on the market, making it the first champagne developed specifically for American tastes. He also invented and patented the first automatic riddling machine which eliminated the danger of exploding bottles.

    Sonoma County

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    Home to a diverse array of smaller AVAs with varied microclimates and soil types, Sonoma County has something for every wine lover. Physically twice as large as Napa Valley, the region only produces about half the amount of wine but boasts both tremendous quality and variety. With its laid-back atmosphere and down-to-earth attitude, the wineries of Sonoma are appreciated by wine tourists for their friendliness and approachability. The entire county intends to become a 100% sustainable winegrowing region by 2019.

    Grape varieties are carefully selected to reflect the best attributes of their sites—Dry Creek Valley’s consistent sunshine is ideal for Zinfandel, while the warm Alexander Valley is responsible for rich, voluptuous Cabernet Sauvignon. Chardonnay and Pinot Noir are important throughout the county, most notably in the cooler AVAs of Russian River, Sonoma Coast and Carneros. Sauvignon Blanc, Merlot and Syrah have also found a firm footing here.

    Champagne & Sparkling

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    Equal parts festive and food-friendly, sparkling wine is beloved for its lively bubbles and appealing aesthetics. Though it is often thought of as something to be reserved for celebrations, sparkling wine can be enjoyed on any occasion—and might just make the regular ones feel a bit more special. Sparkling wine is made throughout the world, but can only be called “Champagne” if it comes from the Champagne region of France. Other regions have their own specialties, like Prosecco in Italy and Cava in Spain. Sweet or dry, white or rosé (or even red!), lightly fizzy or fully sparkling, there is a style of bubbly wine to suit every palate.

    The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, trapping carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. Champagne, Cava and many other sparkling wines (particularly in the New World) are made using the “traditional method,” in which the second fermentation takes place inside the bottle. With this method, dead yeast cells remain in contact with the wine during bottle aging, giving it a creamy mouthful and toasty flavors. For Prosecco, the carbonation process occurs in a stainless steel tank to preserve the fresh fruity and floral aromas preferred for this style of wine.

    YNG71026_2000 Item# 56940