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Kim Crawford Rose 2015

Rosé from Hawkes Bay, New Zealand
    13.5% ABV
    • TP90
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    13.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Pretty pale pink color. A lively nose, brimming with bright berry and tropical fruit. Soft and luscious, this refreshing Rose is richly fruited with hints of watermelon, strawberry, and melon.

    Ideal as an aperitif or summer sipper, this easy-drinking wine also pairs perfectly with lighter salads and other fare.

    Critical Acclaim

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    Kim Crawford

    Kim Crawford

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    Kim Crawford, Hawkes Bay, New Zealand
    Video of winery

    Kim Crawford Wines started out in a small Auckland cottage in New Zealand. Since its launch in 1996, the label has gained critical acclaim around the globe. Kim Crawford wines capture the true aromas and flavors of New Zealand in each bottle. The established leader of luxury-priced Sauvignon Blanc from New Zealand, Kim Crawford combines a passion for excellence in winemaking with a vision of exploring new boundaries.

    Hawkes Bay

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    An eclectic region on the east coast of the North Island, Hawkes Bay extends from wide, fertile, coastal plains, inland, to the coast range, whose peaks reach as high as 5,300 feet. While the flatter areas were historically more popular because they are easier to cultivate, their alluvial soils can be too fertile for vines. In the late 20th century, the drive for quality led growers to the hills where soils are free-draining, limestone-rich and more suited to producing high quality wines.

    Over the passing of time, the old Ngaruroro River laid down deep, gravelly beds, which were subsequently exposed after a huge flood in the 1860’s. In the 1980s growers identified this stretch, which continues for approximately 800 ha, and named it the Gimblett Gravels. The zone has proven to be ideal for the production of excellent red wines, particularly Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Syrah.

    Today the area takes well-earned recognition for its Bordeaux blends and other reds. Expressive of intense stewed red and black berry with gentle herbaceous characters, Gimblett Gravels wines are suggestive of their cool climate origin, and on par with other top-notch Bordeaux blends around the globe.

    Chardonnay is the top white grape in Hawkes Bay, making elegant wines, strong in stone fruit character. Sauvignon blanc comes in close behind, notable for its tropical, fruit forward qualities.

    Rosé Wine

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    Whether it’s playful and fun or savory and serious, most rosé today is not your grandmother’s White Zinfandel, though that category remains strong. Pink wine has recently become quite trendy, and this time around it’s commonly quite dry. It is produced throughout the world from a vast array of grape varieties, but the most successful sources are California, southern France (particularly Provence), and parts of Spain and Italy.

    Since the pigment in red wines comes from keeping fermenting juice in contact with the grape skins for an extended period, it follows that a pink wine can be made using just a brief period of skin contact—usually just a couple of days. The resulting color will depend on the grape variety and the winemaking style, ranging from pale salmon to deep magenta. These wines are typically fresh and fruity, fermented at cool temperatures in stainless steel to preserve the primary aromas and flavors. Most rosé, with a few notable exceptions, should be drunk rather young, within a few years of the vintage.

    SWS417214_2015 Item# 166754