Joseph Cattin Cremant d'Alsace Rose Front Label
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Joseph Cattin Cremant d'Alsace Rose

  • WE90
750ML / 12% ABV
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4.1 40 Ratings
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4.1 40 Ratings
750ML / 12% ABV

Winemaker Notes

Elegant salmon pink color with abundant and dynamic bubbles. The nose is fruity, especially favoring red fruits such as cherry and black currants. Refreshing and creamy palate with fruity aromas such as strawberries and lemon. A clean and long lasting finish.

Critical Acclaim

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WE 90
Wine Enthusiast
Rounded, balanced and harmonious flavors get top marks on this softly pink sparkler. Strawberries and cream, with shortbread and lemon, all unite in perfect unison. The dryness of the palate gives the flavors center stage and provides a fitting, structured autolytic background. This sparkler is classy and delicious, with an ultra clean and lasting finish.
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Joseph Cattin

Domaine Joseph Cattin

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Domaine Joseph Cattin, France
Domaine Joseph Cattin Winery Video

In the late 17th century, François Cattin, born in Porrentruy, Switzerland, came to settle in this small Alsatian village of Voegtlinshoffen located 10 kilometers south of Colmar. In 1720, François Cattin decided to become a winemaker in addition to his job as a builder. The next 11 generations continued his legacy and this how the family business started!

Around 1850, Antoine Cattin decided to focus exclusively on the profession of winemaker. He marked the beginning of specialization that was carried on by by all his descendants. One of his son, Joseph took over the family-owned Estate. At the end of the 19th century, the phylloxera plague started to seriously damage the Alsatian vineyard. Joseph Cattin, having studied successfully, dedicated his time fighting against this plague. He became one of the pioneers of the Alsatian viticulture by beeing rewarded with the diploma of Vignoble modèle. His brother, Théodore, aimed for gastronomy by establishing the restaurant La Cigogne in Paris. This place, renowned for its famous Alsatian gastronomy, is well frequented with the Parisian upper class as well as many foreign guests. This place became then an excellent shop front to expose Alsatian wines from his brother Joseph. Joseph Cattin as a brand was born!

After the death of Joseph, his son, Antoine, took over the company surrounded by 7 hectares of vines. Renowned winemaker for the quality his fine wines, Antoine truly cared for preserving the body and the uniqueness that create the originality of Alsatian wines.

In 1978, Jacques and Jean-Marie, grandsons of Joseph Cattin, took over the family-owned Estate; Jacques, as the manager and Jean- Marie running the vineyard operations. Jacques began at first to modernize the Cattin Winery; a new dynamic was created. In 25 years, means of production have completely been transformed and the vineyard has been spread over 60 hectares.

In 2007, Jacques Junior, joined the company after having studied engineering in agronomy and winemaking. In collaboration with his father, Jacques Cattin Senior, Jacques junior took charge of the wine-making and the financial department. His wife, Anaïs, graduated from a prestigious business school and with strong experiences toward international commerce, joined the company in 2012. She is currently responsible for international sales department.

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With its fairytale aesthetic, Germanic influence and strong emphasis on white wines, Alsace is one of France’s most unique viticultural regions. This hotly contested stretch of land running north to south on France’s northeastern border has spent much of its existence as German territory. Nestled in the rain shadow of the Vosges mountains, it is one of the driest regions of France but enjoys a long and cool growing season. Autumn humidity facilitates the development of “noble rot” for the production of late-picked sweet wines, Vendange Tardive and Sélection de Grains Nobles.

The best wines of Alsace can be described as aromatic and honeyed, even when completely dry. The region’s “noble” varieties, the only ones permitted within Alsace’s 51 Grands Crus vineyards, are Riesling, Gewurztraminer, Muscat, and Pinot Gris.

Riesling is Alsace’s main specialty. In its youth, Alsace Riesling is dry, fresh and floral, but develops complex mineral and flint character with age. Gewurztraminer is known for its signature spice and lychee aromatics, and is often utilized for late harvest wines. Pinot Gris is prized for its combination of crisp acidity and savory spice as well as ripe stone fruit flavors. Muscat, vinified dry, tastes of ripe green grapes and fresh rose petal.

Other varieties grown here include Pinot Blanc, Auxerrois, Chasselas, Sylvaner and Pinot Noir—the only red grape permitted in Alsace and mainly used for sparkling rosé known as Crémant d’Alsace. Most Alsace wines are single-varietal bottlings and unlike other French regions, are also labeled with the variety name.

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What are the different types of sparkling rosé wine?

Rosé sparkling wines like Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and others make a fun and festive alternative to regular bubbles—but don’t snub these as not as important as their clear counterparts. Rosé Champagnes (i.e., those coming from the Champagne region of France) are made in the same basic way as regular Champagne, from the same grapes and the same region. Most other regions where sparkling wine is produced, and where red grape varieties also grow, also make a rosé version.

How is sparkling rosé wine made?

There are two main methods to make rosé sparkling wine. Typically, either white wine is blended with red wine to make a rosé base wine, or only red grapes are used but spend a short period of time on their skins (maceration) to make rosé colored juice before pressing and fermentation. In either case the base wine goes through a second fermentation (the one that makes the bubbles) through any of the various sparkling wine making methods.

What gives rosé Champagne and sparkling wine their color and bubbles?

The bubbles in sparkling wine are formed when the base wine undergoes a secondary fermentation, which traps carbon dioxide inside the bottle or fermentation vessel. During this stage, the yeast cells can absorb some of the wine’s color but for the most part, the pink hue remains.

How do you serve rosé sparkling wine?

Treat rosé sparkling wine as you would treat any Champagne, Prosecco, Cava, and other sparkling wine of comparable quality. For storing in any long-term sense, these should be kept at cellar temperature, about 55F. For serving, cool to about 40F to 50F. As for drinking, the best glasses have a stem and a flute or tulip shape to allow the bead (bubbles) and beautiful rosé hue to show.

How long do rosé Champagne and sparkling wine last?

Most rosé versions of Prosecco, Champagne, Cava or others around the “$20 and under” price point are intended for early consumption. Those made using the traditional method with extended cellar time before release (e.g., Champagne or Crémant) can typically improve with age. If you are unsure, definitely consult a wine professional for guidance.

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