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J.K. Carriere Antoinette Pinot Noir 2011

Pinot Noir from Willamette Valley, Oregon
  • RP92
12.5% ABV
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12.5% ABV

Winemaker Notes

The wine is translucent garnet in color, with a nose that immediately gives cherry and flint. Wound and serious on the palate, the wine presents pie cherry, perhaps wild cherry, grilled steak and black pepper. Paraphrased, it's a Pinot with screaming acidity that throws raspberry and blood orange down your palate for a very long time and promises a very long future.

Critical Acclaim

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RP 92
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Representing 122 cases from Temperance Hill’s oldest block, the J. K. Carriere 2011 Pinot Noir Antoinette was – as usual for this bottling – exposed to less new wood than were its siblings. Oily tangerine and blood orange rinds as well as a quickening sense of their fresh juices lend allure, piquant invigoration and refreshment to this bottling’s sappy, energetic performance. Tart red currant and wild cherry laced with its pits offer delectable synergy with citrus, and the tannins here are ultra-fine. Expect excitement well into the next decade.
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J.K. Carriere

J.K. Carriere

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J.K. Carriere, Willamette Valley, Oregon
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Meet owner and winemaker Jim Prosser. He grew up east of the Cascade Mountain Range in Oregon in a sleepy little skiing and timber town called Bend where you'll find plenty of sunshine and sagebrush. Instilled with a strong work ethic, compliments of the family hardware store, Jim got a degree from Oregon State before entrenching himself in the corporate world of Xerox and commercial real estate. He spent time in Europe, lived in Lithuania as a business advisor for the Peace Corps, climbed in Pakistan, traveled five continents, wound down a family business, sold Christmas trees, and cycled the United States before being seduced... by the elusiveness of Pinot Noir.

Jim has come to understand Pinot noir from the messy grape cellar end of things and learned the trade by working for eight great producers in four countries including: Erath, Domaine Drouhin, Brick House and Chehalem in Oregon; Villa Maria in New Zealand; Tarra Warra and T'Gallant in Australia; and Domaine Georges Roumier in Burgundy. These are his friends and they have provided his foundation.

In 1999, he established his own winery, sourced good grapes and started making wine as J.K. Carriere, the combined names of his grandfathers. From the start J.K. Carriere wines have received critical acclaim. Jim will tell you his success stems from great vineyards, focused winemaking and the willingness to go right through the middle of the work. He makes primarily Pinot noir, producing classic, vivid and ageable wines with fruit on the first uptake, movement on the palate and elegance throughout. Jim's intent is to astonish you, intentionally spark you, and give you every reason to share that experience with someone else. In fact, this is his ruthless pursuit.

Willamette Valley

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One of Pinot Noir’s most successful New World outposts, the Willamette Valley is the largest and most important AVA in Oregon. With a Mediterranean climate moderated by a Pacific Ocean influence, it is perfect for cool-climate viticulture—warm and dry summers allow for steady, even ripening, and frost is rarely a risk during spring and winter.

Mountain ranges bordering three sides of the valley, particularly the Chehalem Mountains, provide the option for higher-elevation, cooler vineyard sites. The three prominent soil types here create significant differences in wine styles between vineyards and sub-AVAs. The iron-rich, basalt-based Jory volcanic soils found commonly in the Dundee Hills are rich in clay and hold water well; the chalky, sedimentary soils of Ribbon Ridge, Yamhill-Carlton and McMinnville encourage complex root systems as vines struggle to search for water and minerals. Silty, loess soils are found in the Chehalem Mountains.

Pinot Noir

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One of the most finicky yet rewarding grapes to grow, Pinot Noir is a labor of love for many. However, the greatest red wines of Burgundy prove that it is unquestionably worth the effort. In fact, it is the only red variety permitted in Burgundy. Highly reflective of its terroir, Pinot Noir prefers calcareous soils and a cool climate, requires low yields to achieve high quality and demands a lot of attention in the vineyard and winery. It retains even more glory as an important component of Champagne as well as on its own in France’s Loire Valley and Alsace regions. This sensational grape enjoys immense international success, most notably growing in Oregon, California and New Zealand with smaller amounts in Chile, Germany (as Spätburgunder) and Italy (as Pinot Nero).

In the Glass

Pinot Noir is all about red fruit—strawberry, raspberry and cherry with some heftier styles delving into the red or purple plum and in the other direction, red or orange citrus. It is relatively pale in color with soft tannins and a lively acidity. With age (of which the best examples can handle an astounding amount) it can develop hauntingly alluring characteristics of fresh earth, savory spice, dried fruit and truffles.

Perfect Pairings

Pinot’s healthy acidity cuts through the oiliness of pink-fleshed fish like salmon and tuna but its mild mannered tannins give it enough structure to pair with all sorts of poultry: chicken, quail and especially duck. As the namesake wine of Boeuf Bourguignon, Pinot noir has proven it isn’t afraid of beef. California examples work splendidly well with barbecue and Pinot Noir is also vegetarian-friendly—most notably with any dish that features mushrooms.

Sommelier Secret

For administrative purposes, the region of Beaujolais is often included in Burgundy. But it is extremely different in terms of topography, soil and climate, and the important red grape here is ultimately Gamay. Truth be told, there is a tiny amount of Gamay sprinkled around the outlying parts of Burgundy (mainly in Maconnais) but it isn’t allowed with any great significance and certainly not in any Villages or Cru level wines.

RVLRIJK11PNA1_2011 Item# 141714