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J Vineyards Russian River Vin Gris 2013

Rosé from Russian River, Sonoma County, California
    14.3% ABV
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    14.3% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    The golden-pink hued 2013 Vin Gris features aromas of red cherry, strawberry and a perfumed bouquet of fresh cut flowers. The palate offers tart cherry, wild strawberry, rose petals and clean, crisp acidity.

    Will pair elegantly with spinach salad topped with pecans and strawberries, watermelon gazpacho, and barbequed oysters with chipotle butter

    Critical Acclaim

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    J Vineyards

    J Vineyards & Winery

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    J Vineyards & Winery, Russian River, Sonoma County, California
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    Since 1986, J Vineyards & Winery has developed a reputation as one of the top sparkling and varietal wine producers in California. Known for its celebrated estate vineyards and world-class hospitality, what truly sets J apart is its Traditional Method sparkling process and elevated winemaking techniques. Winemaker Nicole Hitchcock showcases her expertise and the diversity of California winegrowing regions through a portfolio of acclaimed varietal and sparkling wines. Visit the renowned hospitality center in the heart of the Russian River Valley to enjoy one of the many tasting experiences or the innovative pairings created by Executive Chef Carl Shelton in the Bubble Room.

    Russian River

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    A standout region for its decidedly Californian take on Burgundian varieties, the Russian River Valley is named for the eponymous river that flows through it. While there are warm pockets of the AVA, it is mostly a cool-climate growing region thanks to breezes and fog from the nearby Pacific Ocean.

    Chardonnay and Pinot Noir reign supreme in Russian River, with the best examples demonstrating a unique combination of richness and restraint. The cool weather makes Russian River an ideal AVA for sparkling wine production, utilizing the aforementioned varieties. Zinfandel also performs exceptionally well here. Within the Russian River Valley lie the smaller appellations of Chalk Hill and Green Valley. The former, farther from the ocean, is relatively warm, with a focus on red and white Bordeaux varieties. The latter is the coolest, foggiest parcel of the Russian River Valley and is responsible for outstanding Pinot Noir and Chardonnay.

    Rosé Wine

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    Whether it’s playful and fun or savory and serious, most rosé today is not your grandmother’s White Zinfandel, though that category remains strong. Pink wine has recently become quite trendy, and this time around it’s commonly quite dry. It is produced throughout the world from a vast array of grape varieties, but the most successful sources are California, southern France (particularly Provence), and parts of Spain and Italy.

    Since the pigment in red wines comes from keeping fermenting juice in contact with the grape skins for an extended period, it follows that a pink wine can be made using just a brief period of skin contact—usually just a couple of days. The resulting color will depend on the grape variety and the winemaking style, ranging from pale salmon to deep magenta. These wines are typically fresh and fruity, fermented at cool temperatures in stainless steel to preserve the primary aromas and flavors. Most rosé, with a few notable exceptions, should be drunk rather young, within a few years of the vintage.

    CGM30418_2013 Item# 129962