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If You See Kay 2011

Other Red Blends from Italy
    13.5% ABV
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    Currently Unavailable $19.99
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    13.5% ABV

    Winemaker Notes

    Kay smells amazing; she's soft, creamy, juicy, rich, and powerful all at the same time. A dark and brooding wine, hints of imminent danger, ripe with confidence and purpose; on a mission. She's more than a mouthful, but never wasteful – like handfuls of juicy ripe blackberries dripping from your hands, so perfectly ripe that you have to go back again and again for another taste.

    Critical Acclaim

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    If You See Kay

    If You See Kay

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    If You See Kay, Italy
    If You See Kay is another innovative offering from visionary winemaker Jayson Woodbridge and partner Chris Radomski.

    Having created a host of successful brands such as Hundred Acre, Cherry Pie and Layer Cake wines, they saw the opportunity to develop a sexy, provocative wine outside the boundaries of traditional wine styles, themes and packaging. Selecting fruit from top vineyards in Lazio, Italy, if you see kay is a luscious Cabernet Sauvignon blend that boldly illustrates the team's winemaking philosophy: "Risk everything."

    If You See Kay is a culmination of outstanding winemaking and the image of a strong woman, Kay, who embodies the principles of living life to the fullest. The graphic image of Kay as a tattooed woman on a motorcycle perfectly captures the "wide open-throttle" approach to winemaking and was an apt representation of the new brand.

    Named “Oenotria” by the ancient Greeks for its abundance of grapevines, Italy has always had a culture that is virtually inextricable from wine. Wine grapes are grown just about everywhere throughout the country—a long and narrow boot-shaped peninsula extending into the Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas. The defining geographical feature of the country is the Apennine Mountain range, extending from Liguria in the north to Calabria in the south. The island of Sicily nearly grazes the toe of Italy’s boot, while Sardinia lies to the country’s west. Climate varies significantly throughout the country, with temperature being somewhat more dependent on elevation than latitude, though it is safe to generalize that the south is warmer. Much of the highest quality viticulture takes place on gently rolling, picturesque hillsides.

    Italy boasts more indigenous varieties than any other country—between 500 and 800, depending on whom you ask—and most wine production relies upon these native grapes. In some regions, international varieties have worked their way in, but their use is declining in popularity, especially as younger growers begun to take interest in rediscovering forgotten local specialties. Sangiovese is the most widely planted variety in the country, reaching its greatest potential in parts of Tuscany. Nebbiolo is the prized grape of Piedmont in the northwest, producing singular, complex and age-worthy wines. Other important varieties include Montepulciano, Trebbiano, Barbera, Nero d’Avola and of course, Pinot Grigio.

    Other Red Blends

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    With hundreds of red grape varieties to choose from, winemakers have the freedom to create a virtually endless assortment of blended wines. In many European regions, strict laws are in place determining the set of varieties that may be used, but in the New World, experimentation is permitted and encouraged. Blending can be utilized to enhance balance or create complexity, lending different layers of flavors and aromas. For example, a variety that creates a fruity and full-bodied wine would do well combined with one that is naturally high in acidity and tannins. Sometimes small amounts of a particular variety are added to boost color or aromatics. Blending can take place before or after fermentation, with the latter, more popular option giving more control to the winemaker over the final qualities of the wine.

    RWC189673_2011 Item# 128264