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Howard Park Scotsdale Cabernet Sauvignon 2013

Cabernet Sauvignon from Australia
  • JH94
  • RP91
14% ABV
  • JS93
  • RP91
  • WE90
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14% ABV

Winemaker Notes

This wine has a wild, ethereal presence with aromas of briary, hedgerow fruits. Fragrant sweet spice and doughy oak notes add a warmth and dimension. More refined than robust, the palate’s soft, plush red fruits give richness and the fine line of supple tannins, length and structure.

Critical Acclaim

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JH 94
Australian Wine Companion
Vines planted in '67. 40% new French oak. It's an example of effortless quality. It tastes of blackcurrant, bay leaves, smoky/creamy oak and gravel, but the way the flavour swooshes through the mouth and then slings out through the finish determines its quality.
RP 91
Robert Parker's Wine Advocate
Deep garnet-purple colored, the 2013 Cabernet Sauvignon Scotsdale offers ripe, exuberant black fruits notes of crushed black cherries and black berries with hints of cedar, violets, lavender and cloves. Medium-bodied and still very taut in the mouth, it has a firm foundation for grainy tannins framing the juicy flavors very nicely and delivering a long, herb laced finish. Rating: 91(+) Points
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Howard Park

Howard Park

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Howard Park, Australia
Image of winery
Strangely enough the owners of Howard Park, Jeff and Amy Burch, became involved with wine through Jeff’s love of surfing. It started 15 years ago when they bought a beach shack at Yallingup, near the renowned surfing beaches of the Margaret River area.

Jeff would spend hours surfing on his long board, resembling what the locals call a “shark biscuit”.

Also a lover of golf, Jeff Burch admits he is “still trying to work out how to run a wine business from the golf course”. As some form of consolation he has built a golf hole right outside their Margaret River winery. As well as having a lot of fun, Jeff and Amy work very hard and together inject a great deal of passion into Howard Park. They have recently breathed some new life into the brand with a stunning redesign of the labels. The new labels depict a serpent in the “Tree of Life” and better reflect the truly prestigious nature of the wines.

The founding philosophy of Howard Park is to acquire the finest possible fruit from various distinguished growers from the Margaret River and Great Southern regions of Western Australia. The wine is then made with minimal input in order to reveal the character of the fruit. The key element in this simple philosophy is that premium wines can only come from excellent fruit. The sourcing of this fruit from specific vineyards, and in many cases specific blocks on the vineyard, is the single most important factor in the production of the Howard Park wines. As a result, the riesling, chardonnay and cabernet merlot produced are only ever available in very small quantities, but are noted for their rare balance of elegance and power and a proven history of rewarding ageing with increased complexity and interest.

Howard Park was one of the original pioneers in Western Australia’s Great Southern region and was originally based in the coastal town of Denmark since its conception in 1986. Denmark is a beautiful area where the forest meets the sea and the Howard Park winery there hosts one of the most impressive cellar doors in the Great Southern region, situated on an historical 100-acre property known as “Parkhead”.

The Burches recently constructed their second state of the art winery in Margaret River. The building is surrounded by tall marri and jarrah trees and is a unique presence in the Margaret River region. It was built using the Chinese principles of Feng Shui and has since been awarded by the Royal Australian Institute of Architecture.

Michael Kerrigan is chief winemaker who oversees production in both Margaret River and Denmark. His most recent achievement is the launch of a brand new wine into the Howard Park stable. The new Leston Shiraz is the first single vineyard wine and it exhibits all the hallmarks of quality and regional characteristics you can expect from Howard Park.

Australia

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A large, climatically diverse country producing just about every wine style imaginable, Australia is not just a source of blockbuster Shiraz or inexpensive wine with cute labels, though both can certainly be found here. Australia has a grand winemaking history and some of the oldest vines on the planet, along with a huge range of landscapes and climates; it is impossible to make generalizations about Australian wine. Most regions are concentrated in the south of the country with those inland experiencing warm, dry weather, and those in more coastal areas receiving humid and tropical, or maritime weather patterns. Australia has for several decades been at the forefront of winemaking technology and has widely adopted the use of screwcaps, even for some premium and ultra-premium bottles.

Shiraz is indeed Australia’s most celebrated and widely planted variety, typically producing bold, supple reds with sweet, jammy fruit and performing best in the Barossa and Hunter Valleys. Cabernet Sauvignon is often blended with Shiraz, and also shines on its own particularly in Coonawarra and Margaret River. Grenache and Mourvèdre (often locally referred to as Mataro) are also popular, both on their own and alongside Shiraz in Rhône blends. Chardonnay is common throughout the country and made in a wide range of styles. Sauvignon Blanc has recently surged in popularity to compete with New Zealand’s distinctive version, and Semillon is often utilized as its blending partner, or in the Hunter Valley, on its own to make complex, age-worthy whites. Riesling thrives in the cool-climate Clare and Eden Valleys. Sticky-sweet fortified wine Rutherglen Muscat is a beloved regional specialty of Victoria. Thanks to the country’s relatively agreeable climate throughout and the openness of its people, experimentation is common and ongoing, and there are a vast array of intriguing varieties to be found.

Cabernet Sauvignon

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A noble variety bestowed with both power and concentration, Cabernet Sauvignon is now the world's most planted grape variety. Inherently high in tannins and acidity, the best bottlings of Cabernet can age beautifully, with the ability to last fifty years or more. Cabernet Sauvignon flourishes in temperate climates like Bordeaux's Medoc region and forms the base of the Medoc reds, which are typically mostly Cabernet with Merlot and smaller amounts of some combination of Cabernet Franc, Malbec and Petit Verdot. (Enjoying a great deal of success in various regions around the world, this blend is now globally referred to as a Bordeaux Blend.) Cabernet Sauvignon has enjoyed great success throughout the world, particularly in the Napa Valley, and is responsible for some of the world’s most prestigious and sought-after “cult” wines.

In the Glass

High in color, tannin and extract, Cabernet Sauvignon expresses notes of blackberry, cassis, plum, currant, spice and tobacco. In Bordeaux and elsewhere in the Old World you'll find the more earthy, tannic side of Cabernet, where it is typically blended to soften tannins and add complexity. In warmer regions like California Washington, Argentina, Chile and Australia, you can typically expect more ripe fruit flavors upfront.

Perfect Pairings

Cabernet Sauvignon is right at home with rich, intense meat dishes—beef, lamb and venison, in particular—where its opulent fruit and decisive tannins make an equal match to the dense protein of the meat. With a mature Cabernet, opt for tender, slow-cooked meat dishes.

Sommelier Secrets

Despite the modern importance and ubiquity of Cabernet Sauvignon, it is actually a relatively young variety. In 1997, DNA profiling revealed the grape to be a spontaneous crossing of Cabernet Franc and Sauvignon Blanc which took place in 17th century southwestern France.

MSW30180684_2013 Item# 166247